Thursday, April 30, 2009

In the Wings: Private Lives. Meet Lisa Stanforth.


Lisa Stanforth plays Amanda in Private Lives by Noël Coward, the final production of the 2008-2009 Mainstage Season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette.

Lisa has experience performing in musicals, but not straight plays. However Kate Walker, Lisa's director in Children of Eden, encouraged her to be part of Private Lives.

"Kate told me that Sidney Pellissier is a great director and I'd learn a lot from him about acting," Lisa said. "Also I found the characters superficial at first, but there are so many layers underneath. Those layers are fun to portray."

Lisa plays Amanda, a divorcee whom Lisa says "married the polar opposite of her ex-husband. She thinks she'll have a happier, calmer, settled-down married life with Victor until she runs into Elyot, her ex-husband, while on her honeymoon. They discover they are as attracted to one another as ever, and decide to run off with one another. The question they face becomes 'Can we stay together?'"

Lisa has performed in Civic Theatre shows with large casts -- Disney's High School Musical and Children of Eden -- but has found that working in a small cast creates an intense rehearsal process.

"There's less time offstage and less downtime, so you're always concentrating on what you're doing," she said. "There is a lot more memorization because you're one-fifth of the cast. Being in Private Lives has been a very good experience for me because it's gotten me out of my comfort zone. I had not really experienced being onstage with only one or two other people."

Lisa concluded by explaining what audiences will respond to in the show.

"Audiences will enjoy the humor, but they will find characters they can relate to because of some relationship they're either in or have been in the past," she said.

Private Lives opens Friday, May 8, and runs each Friday, Saturday and Sunday through May 24. The Friday and Saturday evening shows begin at 8:00 p.m.; the Sunday afternoon shows begin at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $15 for adults, $10 for youth.

For more information about the show or to order tickets, please call 765-423-PLAY (7529) or visit Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette's Web site.

Wednesday, April 29, 2009

In the Wings: Private Lives. Meet Matt Turczi.


Matt Turczi plays Victor in Private Lives by Noël Coward, the final production of the 2008-2009 Mainstage Season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette.

Although the production marks his acting debut with Civic, Matt acted in several productions in high school.

"There had been a three-year gap in which I hadn't done much performing, however," he said. "I read about auditions for the show on Civic's Web site. I had previously read Coward's Design for Living, but not Private Lives so I checked out a copy of the script from the library before auditions."

Matt described Victor as a man who wants to enjoy a happy, normal life. Amanda, whom he has just married, throws his plans into disarray when she runs off to elope with another man while on her honeymoon with Victor.

Matt concluded by suggesting what audiences may take away from watching a performance of Private Lives.

"The audience will find the play entertaining and funny throughout. Then they'll think about it and realize that the characters may be enjoyable onstage but they're horrible people," he explained. "Private Lives is a comedy of manners, in which the main characters are horrible people but audiences still support them throughout the action."

Private Lives opens Friday, May 8, and runs each Friday, Saturday and Sunday through May 24. The Friday and Saturday evening shows begin at 8:00 p.m.; the Sunday afternoon shows begin at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $15 for adults, $10 for youth.

For more information about the show or to order tickets, please call 765-423-PLAY (7529) or visit Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette's Web site.

Tuesday, April 28, 2009

In the Wings: Private Lives. Meet Kristen Lesniak.


Kristen Lesniak plays Sybil in Private Lives by Noël Coward, the final production of the 2008-2009 Mainstage Season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette.

The show marks Kristen's acting debut with Civic. She had not been involved with theatre for a number of years, but worked backstage for this season's production of Children of Eden.

"Kate Walker, who directed Children of Eden, told me that Sidney Pellissier is a fabulous director," Kristen said. "She strongly recommended that I audition for Private Lives."

At the start of the play, Sybil is enjoying her honeymoon with Elyot, who is about 10 years older than her.

"Problems arise when Elyot wants to leave the hotel, but won't explain why to Sybil," Kristen said. "Elyot ends up stranding her at the hotel, and she vows to track him down to find out what has happened. She wants an ideal married life, which is what she thought she was getting when she married him."

Kristen explained that audience members may be able to relate to at least one of the characters on stage, perhaps either seeing how ridiculous they were while in a relationship or feel justified in how they behaved in a relationship.

She also said the audience will enjoy the language of the script.

"The dialogue is so well-written and the repartee between the characters is delightful to act," she said. "The audience will take away how dynamic life is and what happens when it throws you a curveball."

Private Lives opens Friday, May 8, and runs each Friday, Saturday and Sunday through May 24. The Friday and Saturday evening shows begin at 8:00 p.m.; the Sunday afternoon shows begin at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $15 for adults, $10 for youth.

For more information about the show or to order tickets, please call 765-423-PLAY (7529) or visit Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette's Web site.

Monday, April 27, 2009

In the Wings: Private Lives. Meet Sidney Pellissier, the director.


Sidney Pellissier directs Private Lives, the final production of the 2008-2009 Mainstage Season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. The script was written by Noël Coward.

A Civic Theatre veteran, Sidney has directed several shows. He especially loves comedies and shows with smaller casts, two traits of Private Lives. He also enjoys the language of the script.

"It is beautiful, elegant, witty and wry," Sidney said. "The show is about divorced people who get back together and live in sin, as they say, but there's not a single off-color word in the script. And it's interesting to me as a retired language teacher to work with a cast where one person speaks French and everyone else is doing a British accent. It's fun to work with the actors and bring them into this."

The first act is set in Deauville, France, which Sidney described as a very elegant place. Elyot and Amanda, a previously married couple that divorced, are newly remarried to other people and starting their honeymoons in rooms that are next door to one another and share a terrace.

"That's where the fireworks begin," Sidney explained.

He concluded by explaining what an audience may take away from a performance of Private Lives.

"Audiences will come away from an experience where they have a wonderful time laughing and mocking the characters," he said. "But they'll realize later that the situation wasn't so funny. The play speaks to morality/amorality. These people are very superficial and shallow, they're beguiling and charming but they're not kind people. They're very egocentric and selfish, and very much like children who haven't been socialized yet. They don't take responsibility for anything they do."

Private Lives opens Friday, May 8, and runs each Friday, Saturday and Sunday through May 24. Friday and Saturday evening shows begin at 8:00 p.m. Sunday afternoon shows begin at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $15 for adults, $10 for youth.

For more information about the show or to order tickets, call 765-423-PLAY (7529) or visit Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette's Web site.

Sunday, April 26, 2009

Announcing auditions: The King and I

Audition dates for The King and I, the 2009-2010 season’s Civic Under the Stars production, have been announced. Director Rob Spaulding will be holding auditions for the general cast and singers on May 3, 4 and 5 from 7 p.m. – 10 p.m. at the old Teachers Delight space at Market Square on Elmwood Avenue.

Actors should come prepared with a short monologue if possible, and also plan on staying for some readings. Singers will audition with music from the show – “Getting to Know You,” “Whistle a Happy Tune” or “We Kiss in the Shadows” – as well as run through arpeggios to test vocal range.

Auditions for dancers will take place May 8 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Lafayette Ballet ballroom at 226 N. 6th Street, Suite 300.

Dancers are asked to wear close-fitting dance attire with their hair pulled away from the face. Please wear ballet shoes, jazz shoes or audition barefoot. No dance sneakers or street shoes are allowed. Dancers should be prepared to take a short warm-up class to learn a sequence of choreography and perform it at the audition. No prepared routines will be required.

The King and I will be performed at the Tippecanoe County Amphitheatre on July 10, 11, 17 and 18.

Friday, April 24, 2009

Announcing the cast of The Stinky Cheese Man and other Fair(l)y (Stoopid) Tales

Directors Melanie R. Buchanan and Laurie Russell have announced the cast for The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fair(l)y (Stoopid) Tales, the final production of the 2008-2009 Civic Youth Theatre season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. The script is based on the book of the same name by Jon Scieszka.

The cast includes:

  • Ugly Stepsister, Frog – Annie Ellis
  • Stinky Cheese Man – Taylor Bundy
  • Singer #1, Foxy Loxy, Kid #1, Farmhand #2 – Sydney Cason
  • Gnome, Little Frog, Kid #2 – Abby Hummels
  • Ugly Stepmother, Large Frog, Old Man, Farmhand #1 – Elena Escudero
  • Princess, Rumplestiltskin – Tori Rosa
  • Singer #2, Cinderella, Ugly Duckling/Duck – Sally Hale
  • Kid #3, Farmhand #3, Giant – Riley Gray
  • Little Red Hen, Gnome – Hannah Lazarz
  • Jack – Keanna Patterson

The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fair(l)y (Stoopid) Tales opens Friday, June 5 and runs through Sunday, June 7. Friday and Saturday evening performances begin at 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday matinee performances begin at 2:30 p.m. Tickets cost $5 for youth aged 18 and under; $10 for adults.

Wednesday, April 22, 2009

Announcing the cast of The Heidi Chronicles

Director Alice Schwind has announced the cast for The Heidi Chronicles, the final staged reading of the 2008-2009 Staged Reading Series at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. The Pulitzer Prize-winning script is by Wendy Wasserstein.

The cast includes:

  • Heidi Holland – Sally Coffman
  • Susan Johnston – Cindy Modlin Adams
  • Peter Patrone – John David Collier
  • Scoop Rosenbaum – Larry Sommers
  • Chris Boxer, Mark, Waiter, Ray – Steve Martin
  • Jill, Debbie, Lisa – Karen Tislow
  • Fran, Molly, Betsy, April – Laurie Russell
  • Becky, Clara, Denise – Heather Owen
The staged reading of The Heidi Chronicles will be held Tuesday, May 12 at 7 p.m. in the historic Monon Depot Theatre in downtown Lafayette. This is a Pay What You Can event. For more information about the staged reading, please call 765-423-PLAY (7529).

Monday, April 20, 2009

Theatre isn't dead, #2

In a 1999 article in The New York Times, Alvin Klein wrote about the growth of "second stages" as commercial theatres' venues in which to mount smaller-scale productions sometimes of lesser-known works (though not always).

Klein explained the benefits of such spaces.

"For audiences, the comparative intimacy of second stages provides a way to learn, or relearn, the art of listening -- an art increasingly endangered in the theater since the invasion of rock 'n' roll, noise pollution and amplification -- and behavioral skills. (Funny how one rarely hears the crinkling of candy wrappers or the sound of coughing in small theaters.) For regional playhouses, they represent the promise of reinventing theater for the 21st century, and the most assured way of having it all," he wrote.

You can read the entire article here.

My greatest pleasure about this article is knowing that while it was written about commercial theatre in the New York region, Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette was already entrenched in a tradition of producing shows for its Stage II season, shows that might have had content that was more adult or edgy than other shows. While that particular form of programming is not at Civic today, it's apparent that Civic leadership has long seen the need to provide a variety artistic endeavors for both volunteers and audiences alike. That may be how best to explain that Civic Theatre offers four different seasons a year -- Mainstage, Civic Youth Theatre, Civic Under the Stars and the Staged Readings -- in two or three different venues during the year.

Not only does Civic Theatre have a "second space" in terms of physical locations of productions, thanks to the Tippecanoe County Amphitheatre and also the Long Center for the Performing Arts, but it also has multiple programming options to deliver four different seasons to its patrons and volunteers.

Friday, April 17, 2009

Theatre isn't dead, #1

After posting a link to actor Gabriel Byrne's comments on us.imdb.com about the state of theatre and theatregoers, and reading responses from readers of this blog, I wanted to share other people's published points of view about whether theatre is dying. If you find other writings that defy the theory that theatre is dead, please pass them along and they'll be linked to a future blog post.

This first entry comes from The Next Stage: A Magazine About Talking About New Theatre. The article is titled "Theatre is Dead, Long Live Theatre."

Simon, the author, writes, "If we get behind each other, communicate with each other, and support each other, it will cast a net over the entire city (Vancouver, British Columbia) that will create such a buzz that everyone will want to know what all the fuss is about. That’s how this city works, it’s fueled by trends. From Critical Mass to pole-dance classes, cool experience spreads virally here when people start talking about it. The groundwork has been laid for theatre to be Vancouver’s next big trend, it just needs us to push it out of the darkness and into the light, and it will stay there, it’s theatre for crying out loud, the greatest communion of humankind to its universe that’s ever existed. It’s bigger than my company, or your company, it’s necessary, in a way that no other form of art is. It gets us talking. Let’s start by talking amongst ourselves."

You can read the entire article here.

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

Announcing auditions: The Heidi Chronicles

Audition dates have been announced for The Heidi Chronicles by Wendy Wasserstein, the final script in Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette's 2008-2009 staged reading season. They will take place Sunday, April 19 at 6:30 p.m. and Monday, April 20 at 7:30 p.m. in the Civic Theatre office at 313 N. 5th Street in downtown Lafayette.

Director Alice Schwind is looking to cast 5 women and 3 men of various ages. Those auditioning will be asked to read from the script. Copies are available at the Civic Theatre office.

Comprised of a series of interrelated scenes, the play traces the coming of age of Heidi Holland, a successful art historian, as she tries to find her bearings in a rapidly changing world. Gradually distancing herself from her friends, she watches them move from the idealism and political radicalism of their college years through militant feminism and, eventually, back to the materialism that they had sought to reject in the first place. Heidi's own path to maturity involves an affair with the glib, arrogant Scoop Rosenbaum, a womanizing lawyer/publisher who eventually marries for money and position; a deeper but even more troubling relationship with a charming, witty young pediatrician, Peter Patrone, who turns out to be gay; and increasingly disturbing contacts with the other women, now much changed, who were a part of her childhood and college years. Eventually Heidi comes to accept the fact that liberation can be achieved only if one is true to oneself, with goals that come out of need rather than circumstance. As the play ends she is still "alone," but having adopted an orphaned baby, it is clear that she has begun to find a sense of fulfillment and continuity that may well continue to elude the others of her anxious, self-centered generation.

The reading will take place Tuesday, May 12 at 7 p.m. at the historic Monon Depot Theatre in downtown Lafayette. There will be a brief discussion immediately following. It is a Pay What You Can Event.

Is theatre dead?

Visitors to us.imdb.com could read a short article on April 14 about actor Gabriel Byrne's thoughts about the death of theatre.

According to the article, Byrne was in the middle of a run of A Touch of the Poet on Broadway when he "decided theatre-goers were a dying breed."

Byrne saw that the audience members at a particular show were older, well-off people.

"'After the show I turned to one of the other actors and said, ‘Theatre is dead. There’s no one under 60 out there, they’re all white and they can all afford £200 for a night.' Seriously, theatre as we’re doing it now, is dead,' he said."

You can read the entire article here.

So, it's reported on a well-known entertainment Web site that a well-respected contemporary actor believes that one of the establsihed forms of entertainment is dead. That's a pretty damning testimonial.

How would you respond to Byrne's statement? Is theatre dead, or dying? What have you seen or experienced that either confirms or refutes this theory?

Monday, April 13, 2009

Sharing audition tips

Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette's 2009-2010 season is around the corner. As always, there will be many roles for actors of all ages and abilities. The question is: How do the actors who appear onstage during a performance win the roles that so many people covet?

For actors who follow this blog, please share some of your tips for having a good audition. What are some things you always do before, during or after auditions? What are some things you avoid?

For directors who follow this blog, please share some things that you look for when holding auditions. What can actors do to show you that they would be good to work with?

One piece of advice I can offer to prospective auditioners is not to wear a hat. Directors like to see people's faces and, no matter what kind you wear, a hat always casts a shadow. Skip the headgear so directors and your fellow auditioners can see your face.

For other tips, read this article from Wade Bradford of about.com.

Saturday, April 11, 2009

Announcing auditions: The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fair(l)y (Stoopid) Tales

Auditions for The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fair(l)y (Stoopid) Tales, the fourth production of the 2008-2009 Civic Youth Theatre season, have been announced. They will take place Saturday, April 18, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the historic Monon Depot Theatre on the corners of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette.

Directors Melanie R. Buchanan and Laurie Russell and Music Director Shellie K. Johnson are asking auditioners to prepare a memorized monologue no longer than one-and-a-half minutes in length, as well as a verse and chorus from a Broadway musical. They are looking to cast actors age 6 and above.

The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fair(l)y (Stoopid) Tales opens Friday, June 5, and runs through Sunday, June 7.

Friday, April 10, 2009

About.com's 10 plays theatre "newcomers" should see

Wade Bradford of about.com has written a list of 10 plays that newcomers to theatre should see.

"A friend of mine recently confessed, 'I haven't watched a play since junior high.' He then asked me for suggestions. He wanted to know which stage productions were essential for a person who is new to theater-going, who might not have time to see plays very often," Bradford writes. "His question made me wonder... Which plays represent the best elements of the theater?"

Although there are no absolutes when it comes to the Top 10 of anything artistic, Bradford offers some unusual choices. You can read the full list here.

What shows would you suggest to someone who was new to theatre productions? Remember, this isn't a list of your favorite shows, but those that would give a newcomer an idea of what theatre has to offer.

Wednesday, April 8, 2009

Civic Volunteer Album: Meet Cindy Modlin Adams.


The “In the Wings” series of blog posts highlights the directors and actors of each Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette production. And while it makes sense to promote them – actors are the face of a production, and directors are the brains – there are whole groups of volunteers who go unrecognized, not only on this blog but also perhaps by the playgoing public.

The “Civic Volunteer Album” will highlight various Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette volunteers who more often than not volunteer behind the scenes of productions as stage managers, designers, backstage crew and much more. They are the backbone of each production, supporting what everyone else can see and hear on stage.

Cindy Modlin Adams became involved with Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette when she was part of the stage crew for the 1982-1983 season production of Sleuth. She had just relocated from Wisconsin, where she had been actively involved in community theatre.

“I had so much fun and met a lot of people through theatre in Wisconsin, and I wanted to have the same opportunity here in Lafayette,” she said.

Since that show Cindy has served on the Justin M. Newell Scholarship Committee, which recognizes the contributions and achievements of a college-bound graduating senior, and has been active in other productions on the backstage crew, props crew, construction crew and as an actor, including Romantic Comedy in the 1985-1986 season and the 2005-2006 season's production of The Sound of Music at the Tippecanoe County Amphitheater.

”I used to fall asleep listening to the soundtrack from The Sound of Music as a kid so I always wanted to be part of the nun’s chorus, and I had seen Civic’s first production of it at Sunnyside Middle School,” Cindy said. “I was happy to be chosen for the nun’s chorus in 2005, as it was my first time back on stage after a 20-year hiatus.”

One of Cindy’s inspirations to return to the theater was seeing Karl Brandt as Benjamin Franklin in Civic’s production of 1776 at the Long Center for the Performing Arts during the 2000-2001 season.

“Karl was superb in the role,” she said. “And the show was so well done with the costumes, music and dancing.”

Cindy concluded by describing the positive aspects of volunteering at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette.

”You meet talented, creative and fun people,” she said. “You get the chance to try out new skills with experts standing by to help and give advice. There are jobs for about any time commitment, from a few hours to a whole production run. And you help bring the arts to life for others.”

Monday, April 6, 2009

About.com's reasons to support community theatre

Wade Bradford of about.com has written five reasons why people should support community theatre. The reasons include supporting local artists and sharing skills. You can read the full list here.

The list, while not comprehensive, features a common thread: connection. By supporting community theatre as an audience member, an advertiser or a volunteer, a person will find connections to others.

Why do you support community theatre?

Sunday, April 5, 2009

Share Your Thoughts: The Importance of Being Earnest

Now that The Importance of Being Earnest has closed, share your thoughts about the production on this blog.

What will you most remember about the show? What were your thoughts about the performances? The design? The story and theme? What were the standout moments?

The Impertinence of Blogging Earnest -- Week 6: tech week and performances.

The final performance of The Importance of Being Earnest takes place in a few hours. I wanted to share highlights of the past week in this last post of the blog series. The week included building days, tech week and quite a few performances.

During the building days last Saturday and Sunday, almost the entire cast and several of their family members worked together to build the remainder of the stage and the full set pieces for the show. Thank you to Jim Bien, Darrell Denson and Jayne Denson for working with the cast to build the remainder of the stage and covering it with insulation and luan. Along with the cast, they painted the stage and covered the exposed parts at the front of the stage with 12" high luan strips. Everyone worked hard to make it a successful build.

Tracy Rosa and Julie Rosa brought soft tacos for lunch, which everyone gobbled down heartily. It was a very nice meal. Thanks to both the Rosas for their generosity. After lunch, set designer Laurie Russell and I visited Main Street Mercantile on 1000 Main Street and its warehouse at the corner of 18th Street and Elmwood Avenue and found the loveseat / sofa that fit the decor of Algernon's flat in Act I. It was a huge discovery and we were both flying high as we finally found the final piece of the set decoration puzzle.

The main set pieces for the show are periaktoi, triangle-shaped constructions with different scenes painted on each of their three sides. Thanks to Mark Hoffmann, Alex Hoffmann and Eric Barlow, the periaktoi were built to move easily and gracefully around the stage as the scenes changed for each of the three acts. They were painted and decorated by Laurie; they have proven to be quite attention-grabbing as the majority of the audience seems to remain in the theatre during intermissions to watch them be changed from one set to the next.

The opening of tech week brought the backstage crew and booth crew together for the first time. Although the Sunday rehearsal required that the actors be on stage only to deliver line cues so the crews could work on their duties, it was a very important rehearsal as everyone understood and rehearsaed the timing and precision needed for the hsow.

Later in the week, the Journal & Courier sent Tim Brouk, its entertainment reporter, to interview a few cast members and me. Also there were Jamie Lynn Chevillet, the J&C photographer, and Marcos Cisneros, the production photographer. There were several distractions that night and we ended later than expected, but the actors remained focused and the crew carried out their duties very well.

Marcos had previously taken headshots of the actors and photos of the crew, which Tami Robinson used to create the most stunning production callboard I have ever seen. Thank you Tami for your talent and skills.

Thursday night was the pay-what-you-can preview performance; although there were a few moments that needed to be tightened up technically -- speeding up a light cue here or moving a set piece slightly upstage there, for instance -- the audience enjoyed itself. The actors became accustomed to holding slightly for laughs, and there were many. Since that preview night, the cast performed twice on Friday (a school outreach performance and opening night) and twice on Saturday (an afternoon matinee and an evening performance). Each performance, however, has been better than the one before. The actors and crew have proven their endurance in putting together consectuive 2-hour-long shows back-to-back on consecutive days; their talent amazes me.

I couldn't be prouder of the entire cast, crew, and their families. From Day One everyone involved has been working toward a common goal -- to produce an excellent piece of theatre -- and there's been 100 percent commitment to making that happen. Everyone and everything has exceeded my expectations for the production, and the results have been outstanding. Of course it's easy to have an oustanding show when you're working on one of the best comic scripts ever written and have an immensely talented cast.

Thank you to readers who have followed this blog series. I hope some of the insight into the production process has been entertaining.

Warmly yours,
Steve Martin

Friday, April 3, 2009

Alex Bohs creates a teaser trailer for The Importance of Being Earnest.

Alex Bohs, a student at William Henry Harrison High School in West Lafayette, has created a teaser trailer for Civic Youth Theatre's production of The Importance of Being Earnest. You can see the trailer here on YouTube.

Thank you Alex for your time and talent in creating the trailer.

Preview of The Importance of Being Earnest on www.jconline.com

A preview of The Importance of Being Earnest appears online on www.jconline.com, the Web site for the Journal & Courier, Lafayette and West Lafayette's daily newspaper. The preview also can be read in the Journal & Courier's Friday entertainment magazine TGIF.

You can read the preview here.

Thursday, April 2, 2009

Steve Martin speaks about The Importance of Being Earnest on WLFI-TV.

On Thursday's noon news program on WLFI-TV, The Importance of Being Earnest director Steve Martin spoke with Sue Scott about the content of the show, the Civic Youth Theatre program, show dates and more.

You can watch the full interview here.

The Importance of Being Earnest opens tomorrow, Friday, April 3, and runs through Sunday, April 5. To learn more about the show, call Civic Theatre's office at 765-423-PLAY (7529) or visit the Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette Web site.

Wednesday, April 1, 2009

April Fool's Day: Share your favorite theatre practical jokes.

Happy April Fool's Day from Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette.

There are a lot of practical jokes that take place between theatre people. What are some of your favorite practical jokes you've been part of, or observed, in the theatre? Did they happen in rehearsal? During a show?