Thursday, March 31, 2011

In the Wings: Macbeth. Meet Jenny Furtner.


Jenny Furtner plays Lady Macbeth in Macbeth, the third production in the 2010-2011 Civic Youth Theatre season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. The script is by William Shakespeare.

Question: Why did you audition for Macbeth?
Jenny Furtner: Not only do I love Shakespeare, but this is Melanie Buchanan's last show so I wanted to do it. It's also going to be my last show with Civic Youth Theatre. I think it's kind of neat that the very first show I ever acted in was Romeo and Juliet, and my last show is Macbeth.

Q: How would you describe Lady Macbeth?
J.F.: She's calculating and she thinks through everything before she does it. She's also very controlling at the beginning. Then at the end she starts to get crazy. But at the beginning, she's very controlling and wants everything to happen her way. She's very demanding.

Q: What is Lady Macbeth's goal at the start of the play?
J.F.: She reads a letter from her husband that says the witches have prophesied that he would be king. She wants him to be king so she can be queen.

Q: What challenges have you faced with this production?
J.F.: Lady Macbeth is kind of cold at heart, but normally I'm very bright. It's getting into the character but that's one of the fun parts. Playing someone so different from you is one of the most fun things about getting one of these strong, hungry, slightly evil characters.

Q: What do you think an audience will most remember about this production?
J.F.: I think definitely they will remember the action and intensity. We're taking it to the next level and keeping it very dramatic and tragic toward the end, we want to keep everyone on the edge of their seats the whole time.

Macbeth will open Friday, April 8 and run through Sunday, April 10 at the historic Monon Depot Theatre at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette. Friday and Saturday evening performances will begin at 7:30 p.m.; the Sunday afternoon performance will begin at 2:30 p.m.

For more information about the show or to order tickets, call Civic Theatre's office at 765-423-7529 or visit Civic Theatre's website.

Wednesday, March 30, 2011

In the Wings: Macbeth. Meet Evan Nyquist.


Evan Nyquist plays Macduff in Macbeth, the third production in the 2010-2011 Civic Youth Theatre season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. The script is by William Shakespeare.

Question: Why did you audition for Macbeth?
Evan Nyquist: I have been in several productions of Shakespeare, but nothing as serious as Macbeth – they've always been comedies. I really wanted to do some serious acting and this gave me the opportunity to do so. The story, the tragedy of Macbeth really intrigued me, how a man could be such a paragon of justice and loyalty to the king, yet betray the king just because someone said "You can be king."

Q: How would you describe Macduff? What does the audience learn about him?
E.N.: He's a lot like Macbeth at the beginning of the play – he's a loyal soldier to the king. But unlike Macbeth, he doesn't receive this temptation, this inkling of an idea of betrayal. He becomes the antithesis of Macbeth and remains very loyal to the king and those who can rightfully succeed him. He shows how far Macbeth has fallen. Macduff goes through great grief and suffering, but he remains on the path of truth and honesty.

Q: What challenges have you faced with this production so far?
E.N.: One challenge is getting the emotions just right because you have to be angry but not too angry. You have to have the appropriate emotion; it's not just only anger or sadness. You have to know the background of the characters and why they feel that way. A lot of Macduff's sadness turns to anger, which he has to use. It's anger from sadness.

Q: What will an audience most remember about this production?
E.N.: Our fight choreography is going to be fantastic, off the charts. It's nothing like anything I've been involved with before, and from what I hear, nothing like Civic's performed before. I'm interested to see it fully done and I'm sure everyone in the audience will be enthralled with it.

Macbeth will open Friday, April 8 and run through Sunday, April 10 at the historic Monon Depot Theatre at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette. Friday and Saturday evening performances will begin at 7:30 p.m.; the Sunday afternoon performance will begin at 2:30 p.m.

For more information about the show or to order tickets, call Civic Theatre's office at 765-423-7529 or visit Civic Theatre's website.

Tuesday, March 29, 2011

In the Wings: Macbeth. Meet Beatrice Masters, Sydney Cason and Ariel Laukins.


Sydney Cason, Ariel Laukins and Beatrice Masters play the Witches in Macbeth, the third production in the 2010-2011 Civic Youth Theatre season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. The script is by William Shakespeare.

Question: Why did you audition for Macbeth?
Ariel Laukins: I had never read Macbeth before and I thought it would be interesting to read and play. When I read it I really liked the storyline and I thought the characters were cool. I thought I could play some of them.
Sydney Cason: I'm also interested in Shakespeare and I like the story of Macbeth, I had read it before. Also, this is Melanie Buchanan's last show with Civic Youth Theatre and I definitely wanted to do another show with her.
Beatrice Masters: As a senior, I always try to be in shows but I end up being really, really busy with lots of scheduling conflicts so I end up not being able to do anything. I said, "This is Mel's last show, and this is my last CYT show as a senior. It's Macbeth and I really like the play and I like Shakespeare. I don't care what I have to do to my schedule, I'm doing this play."

Q: What are the Witches like? What is their goal and how do they affect the action?
B.M.: We're very classic witches – evil and gleeful at any mischief that we can cause.
S.C.: We're working on different cackles and walks and voices, trying to be as crazy as possible.
A.L.: We tell Macbeth that he will end up being really important, and he wants to do whatever he can to make that happen.

Q: What sort of challenges have you faced with this production?
A.L.: We have a "No Fear Shakespeare" version along with the original text, so we use that to know what we're talking about in the play. But some words have different contexts today, so it's different to hear what they meant back then.
S.C.: When we began reading Shakespeare, it looked like poetry and we wanted to stop at the end of the lines but we learned to keep going as we worked on it.
B.M.: As a Witch, the Shakespearean language is less difficult than it is with other characters. Other characters are trying to read Shakespeare like a modern person with modern emotions. We're not trying to do that, we're just trying to be really creepy and weird. Even if what we said was being translated into modern English, it would still be creepy and weird.

Q: What will an audience most remember about this production?
B.M.: It will be a high-energy show. We don't get to fight, but watching the fight scenes and seeing everyone get involved with that, it's really cool how that's coming together.
S.C.: One of the biggest things in this show will be the fights. They actors are excited about blood packets and hand-to-hand combat and fighting with knives and guns.
A.L. I end up getting to fight when I play another character, and the audience will remember that. And there will be some pretty intense witch makeup.

Macbeth will open Friday, April 8 and run through Sunday, April 10 at the historic Monon Depot Theatre at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette. Friday and Saturday evening performances will begin at 7:30 p.m.; the Sunday afternoon performance will begin at 2:30 p.m.

For more information about the show or to order tickets, call Civic Theatre's office at 765-423-7529 or visit Civic Theatre's website.

Monday, March 28, 2011

In the Wings: Macbeth. Meet Isaiah Hale.


Isaiah Hale plays Duncan in Macbeth, the third production in the 2010-2011 Civic Youth Theatre season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. The script is by William Shakespeare.

Question: Why did you audition for Macbeth?
Isaiah Hale: It's Shakespeare, and Melanie Buchanan is directing it. She does well with Shakespearean productions. I like the challenge and though it's difficult to act when scripts are in our hands, it'll flow nicely when we're memorized.

Q: How would you describe Duncan? What does the audience learn about him?
I.H.: Duncan is iron-fisted, but he knows when to be serious and when not to be serious. He knows how to get respect and be respected and maintain his position. He probably had to step on a few people to get in his position at some point. As far as what the audience learns, Duncan is fooled twice by his friends so he may be a little gullible.

Q: What challenges have you faced with this production so far?
I.H.: Challenges so far have been pronunciation, the differences between names and titles, sometimes getting a little tongue-tied with all the words and there also is a lot of fighting. Many actors are double cast, and it's hard to go from a bloodthirsty cutthroat to a messenger who says "Here's your mail."

Q: What will an audience most remember about this production?
I.H.: Probably the blood that will be used in the stage fights. People don't realize just how much fighting is really in it. We show the battle scenes, and the dead stay on stage a lot. The fights are very fun and very challenging.

Macbeth will open Friday, April 8 and run through Sunday, April 10 at the historic Monon Depot Theatre at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette. Friday and Saturday evening performances will begin at 7:30 p.m.; the Sunday afternoon performance will begin at 2:30 p.m.

For more information about the show or to order tickets, call Civic Theatre's office at 765-423-7529 or visit Civic Theatre's website.

Sunday, March 27, 2011

Share Your Thoughts: Out of Order


Now that Out of Order has closed, share your thoughts about the production.

What will you remember about the show? What were your thoughts about the performances? The story and theme? The design? What were the standout moments?

In the Wings: Macbeth. Meet Brent Wick, assistant director and fight choreographer.


Brent Wick is the assistant director and fight choreographer for Macbeth, the third production in the 2010-2011 Civic Youth Theatre season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. The script is by William Shakespeare.

Question: What are your duties as the fight choreographer for Macbeth?
Brent Wick: My duties include showing the actors the illusion of fighting on stage: how to move, how to take a hit and how to fall. I'm choreographing the fights almost as a dance so they know when and where to move.

Q: What are some basic rules of fight choreography?
B.W.: The basic rule is that all fights are an illusion. There is no contact being made. The person who is attacked sells the illusion, nine times out of ten, rather than the person attacking.

Q: This production is modernizing the action. How might the fights have been done in Shakespeare's day, and how is this production different?
B.W.: Originally there would have been a lot of swords and maybe a staff of two. We didn't want to put our production in a specific time period but we modernized it so there are some guns used and the climactic fight will include knives. This modern feel may help audiences relate to the action a little better.

Q: What challenges are there to working with a cast this large?
B.W.: It's been a challenge to pull emotions from the actors so they understand what these fights are about. There are two fights where everyone is onstage fighting at the same time and it's been a challenge to make sure the fights look realistic and everyone understands why they're there.

Q: What will an audience most remember about this production?
B.W.: It's a very violent show, and people will remember the fights. But I also hope that people take away the message of the show, and how it applies today: that power and greed will eventually end in demise.

Macbeth will open Friday, April 8 and run through Sunday, April 10 at the historic Monon Depot Theatre at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette. Friday and Saturday evening performances will begin at 7:30 p.m.; the Sunday afternoon performance will begin at 2:30 p.m.

For more information about the show or to order tickets, call Civic Theatre's office at 765-423-7529 or visit Civic Theatre's website.

Friday, March 25, 2011

Soliciting original script submissions for the 2011-2012 Staged Reading series


In the four years the Staged Reading series has been part of the Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette season, at least one of the scripts has been an original, previously unproduced script written by a local playwright:
  • * 2007-2008: Pia Zadora Sings Gershwin by Deborah Gray and A Very Bad Day for Brandon Butterworth by Scott Haan
  • * 2008-2009: In the Weeds by Steve Gooch
  • * 2009-2010: TILT by Laurie Russell
  • * 2010-2011: Roman Cokes by Jeff Spanke

The original script for the 2011-2012 Staged Reading series has yet to be selected. The committee preparing the season is soliciting submissions for original, previously unproduced scripts by local playwrights. Here are the script submission guidelines:

  • * Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette prefers a full script submission.
  • * Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette will accept a query/synopsis along with a 5-page dialogue sample.
  • * Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette prefers electronic submissions, which may be sent to steve@lafayettecivic.org
  • * Mailed submissions must be sent to:
    Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette
    Attn: Staged Reading Committee
    313 N. 5th Street
    Lafayette, IN 47901
  • * Submissions sent via mail must include a self-addressed stamped envelope or self-addressed stamped postcard.
  • * There is no cost to submit an original script. Playwrights are limited to submitting no more than 3 scripts.
  • * Deadline for submissions: September 30, 2011
  • * Response date: No later than November 3, 2011
  • * Probability of being selected: At least one original script per year is included in the Staged Reading series out of the entire pool of submissions.
  • * Contract: There are no royalties paid at this time.
  • * Cast size: Ten or fewer actors are preferred.
  • * Length: Scripts may be either one act or full length.
  • * Geographic requirements: Playwrights must have their primary residency in the 14-county area served by the Tippecanoe Arts Federation – Benton County, Carroll County, Cass County, Clinton County, Fountain County, Howard County, Jasper County, Montgomery County, Newton County, Pulaski County, Tippecanoe County, Tipton County, Warren County and White County.

Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is a community theatre located in downtown Lafayette, Indiana. Its home is the historic Monon Depot Theatre, which has a seating capacity of 155.

For more information about the Staged Reading series, please call 765-423-7529 or visit Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette's Web site.

Thursday, March 24, 2011

The 2011-2012 season: Steve Koehler speaks on WBAA


Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette Managing Director Steve Koehler spoke with Kristin Malavenda of WBAA, Public Radio from Purdue, about the process of selecting the 2011-2012 season and the shows that make up the MainStage, Civic Youth Theatre and Staged Reading seasons.

You can hear the full interview here by clicking on the "Listen" button.

For more information on the 2011-2012 season or to order season tickets, call Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette at 765-423-7529 or visit the theatre's website.

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

Wine, Women and Song: A silent auction fundraiser & preview


Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette presents the second "Wine, Women and Song" silent auction fundraiser and preview of upcoming shows including Little Shop of Horrors and songs from the recently revealed 2011-2012 season.

  • What: A silent auction of more than 80 bottles of wine
  • Where: Adelino's Old World Kitchen, 102 N. 3rd Street, downtown Lafayette
  • When: April 14 from 5:30 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
  • How much: $10 admission
  • Entertainment: A preview of the upcoming production of Little Shop of Horrors and songs from the 2011-2012 season.

Hors d'œuvre will be served and a cash bar will be available.

Tickets are available in advance by calling Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette at 765-423-7529 or at the door the night of the event.

Sunday, March 20, 2011

Announcing the 2011-2012 season at Civic Theatre


Steven Koehler, managing director at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette, has announced the organization's 2011-2012 season, which includes 16 shows in three separate series and two special productions.

"When we develop our seasons, we select shows that appeal to our audiences and our volunteers," Koehler said. "This diverse season includes musicals, dramas, comedies, classics and contemporary shows. There is something for everyone in the 2011-2012 season."

Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette's 2011-2012 season is divided into three series: MainStage, Civic Youth Theatre and Staged Readings.

"The MainStage series is our signature series with five diverse selections, including musicals, dramas, comedies and classics performed at Civic Theatre's historic Monon Depot Theatre in downtown Lafayette," Koehler said. "Civic Youth Theatre productions engage young people age 18 and younger both in acting roles and backstage positions. The Staged Readings are entering their fifth season and focus on plays with great dialogue and themes."

Civic Theatre's 2011-2012 season begins in July with a return to the Tippecanoe County Amphitheater Park for the Pulitzer Prize-winning rock opera RENT.

"After a one-year hiatus from doing productions at the Amphitheater, we're excited to bring the story of love, artistry, friendship and the Bohemian spirit to audiences in the Greater Lafayette area and surrounding areas," Koehler said. "This is a challenging show that will remind everyone of the amazing talent in and around Tippecanoe County."

Civic Theatre also continues its tradition of including a holiday show each year with The Honky Tonk Angels Holiday Spectacular.

"Honky Tonk Angels brought great country music, sass and spirit to the historic Monon Depot Theatre a few seasons ago," Koehler said. "Songs in the holiday spectacular include a Motown Christmas medley, country classics like 'Coat of Many Colors' by Dolly Parton and comedy hits such as 'Grandma Got Run Over by a Reindeer.'"

The MainStage season opens in September with Come Back to the Five and Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean as a group of women reunite in a small dime store in West Texas. Red, White and Tuna, the third installment of the hilarious "Tuna" series, follows in November. The third MainStage show, in January, is the Pulitzer Prize-winning drama Rabbit Hole about a family's grief, followed by March's Red Hot and Cole, a musical biography of Indiana's own Cole Porter. The final show in the MainStage season will be Moliere's classic satire on religious hypocrisy, Tartuffe, or The Impostor, in May.

Civic Youth Theatre opens in October with Rodgers and Hammerstein's Cinderella, a classic musical about the classic fairy tale. February will bring Miss Nelson is Missing, based on Harry Allard and James Marshall's comic children's book about a classroom of misbehaving students and the two very different women who teach them. Pride and Prejudice, based on Jane Austen's romantic novel about Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy, opens in late March. The final production will be Young Directors Project, in which two or three one-act plays will be directed by selected members of Civic Youth Theatre in April.

The five staged readings held during the year will take place the Tuesday following the opening weekends of the MainStage shows. The first is Ruined, a Pulitzer Prize-winning script by Lynn Nottage set during the war in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The second script is another Pulitzer Prize-winner: Anna in the Tropics, which is set in a Cuban-American cigar factory. Farragut North, a scathing drama about the political campaigning process, follows. For the fourth year, the Staged Reading series will include at least one world premiere of an original script. The title for the 2011-2012 has not yet been determined; information about submission guidelines and deadlines will follow soon. The final staged reading is a hilarious satire by Christopher Durang, Why Torture is Wrong, and the People Who Love Them.

The full calendar of the 2011-2012 season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is:

• * Rent, (Summer Production), July 14-16, 2011

• * Come Back to the Five and Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean, (MainStage), Sept. 9-25, 2011

• * Ruined (Staged Reading), Sept. 13, 2011

• * Rodgers and Hammerstein's Cinderella (Civic Youth Theatre), Oct. 7-9, 2011

• * Red, White and Tuna (MainStage), Nov. 4-20, 2011

• * Anna in the Tropics (Staged Reading), Nov. 8, 2011

• * The Honky Tonk Angels Holiday Spectacular (Holiday Show), Dec. 2-18, 2011

• * Rabbit Hole (MainStage), Jan. 20-Feb. 5, 2012

• * Farragut North (Staged Reading), January 24, 2012

• * Miss Nelson is Missing (Civic Youth Theatre), February 17-19, 2012

• * Red Hot and Cole (MainStage), March 2-18, 2012

• * World Premiere(s) (Staged Reading), March 6, 2012

• * Pride and Prejudice (Civic Youth Theatre), March 30-April 1, 2012

• * Young Directors Project (Civic Youth Theatre), April 20-22, 2012

• * Tartuffe, or The Impostor (MainStage), May 11-27, 2012

• * Why Torture Is Wrong, and the People Who Love Them (Staged Reading), May 15

Season tickets go on sale March 21, with discounts of up to 25% are available for series purchases. Single tickets for MainStage shows and special productions will cost $18 for adults, $12 for senior citizens and $10 for youth age 18 and under. Tickets for Civic Youth Theatre productions will cost $10 for adults, $5 for youth age 18 and under. The Staged Readings are Pay What You Can events.

Season tickets can be purchased either by visiting http://www.lafayettecivic.org/ or by calling 765-423-7529. Friday and Saturday evening performances begin at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday afternoon matinee performances begin at 2:30 p.m.

Announcing the 2011-2012 Season: MainStage Season


Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette will produce 5 plays at the historic Monon Depot Theatre in downtown Lafayette during the 2011-2012 MainStage Season. Tickets are $18 for adults, $12 for senior citizens and $10 for youth age 18 and under.
  • Come Back to the Five and Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean by Ed Graczyk
  • September 9-25, 2011

In a small town dime store in West Texas, the "Disciples of James Dean" gather for their twentieth reunion. Now middle-aged women, they were teenagers when Dean filmed Giant two decades ago in nearby Marfa. One of them, an extra in the film, has a child whom she says was conceived with Dean during the shoot. The ladies' congenial reminiscences mingle with flashbacks to their youth; then the arrival of a stunning but familiar stranger sets off a series of confrontations that smash their delusions and expose bitter disappointments.

  • Red, White and Tuna by Jaston Williams, Joe Sears and Ed Howard
  • November 4-20, 2011

The much anticipated third installment in the Tuna trilogy takes the audience through another satirical ride into the hearts and minds of the polyester-clad citizens of Texas' third smallest town. Along with Tuna's perennial favorites, some new Tuna denizens burst into the 4th of July Tuna High School Class Reunion. This sets the stage for a show full of fireworks and fun from the land where the Lion’s Club is too liberal and Patsy Cline never dies.

It’s been several years since we left Bertha and Arles dancing at the end of A Tuna Christmas … Did the romance blossom? Has Didi Snavley received any "cosmic" communications from R.R.'s UFO? Did Stanley make his fortune in the Albuquerque taxidermy business? These and other burning questions will be asked and answered in the side-splitting spoof of life in rural America.

  • Rabbit Hole by David Lindsay-Abaire
  • January 20-February 5, 2012

Becca and Howie Corbett have everything a family could want, until a life-shattering accident turns their world upside down and leaves the couple drifting perilously apart. Rabbit Hole charts their bittersweet search for comfort in the darkest of places and for a path that will lead them back into the light of day.

  • Red Hot and Cole by James Bianchi, Muriel McAuley and Randy Strawderman
  • March 2-18, 2012

He's "throwing a ball tonight" – and you're all invited, to a "swellegant" theatrical party spanning the life of Broadway's greatest wit, the irrepressible Cole Porter.

A scintillating mixture of biography and song, "Red Hot and Cole" celebrates the great American songwriter who brought style, elegance and sophistication to the stages and soundstages of Broadway and Hollywood, delighting the world with his devilishly clever rhymes, fresh and unexpected melodies and sassy, sexy sensibility.

  • Tartuffe, or The Imposter by Molière
  • May 11-27, 2012

Orgon's family is up in arms because Orgon and his mother have fallen under the influence of Tartuffe, a pious fraud (and a vagrant prior to Orgon's help). Tartuffe pretends to be pious and to speak with divine authority, and Orgon and his mother no longer take any action without first consulting him.

The rest of the family and their friends are not fooled by Tartuffe's antics and detest him. The stakes are raised when Orgon announces that he will marry Tartuffe to his daughter Mariane (already engaged to Valère). Mariane is, of course, very upset at this news and the rest of the family realizes how deeply Tartuffe has embedded himself into the family.

Announcing the 2011-2012 Season: Civic Youth Theatre


Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette will produce 3 plays and organize a weekend of one-act plays directed by youth age 18 and under during the 2011-2012 Civic Youth Theatre series. Tickets are $10 for adults, $5 for youth age 18 and under.
  • Rodgers and Hammerstein's Cinderella
  • October 7-9, 2011

The timeless enchantment of a magical fairy tale is reborn with the Rodgers & Hammerstein hallmarks of originality, charm and elegance. Originally presented on television in 1957 starring Julie Andrews, Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Cinderella was the most widely viewed program in the history of the medium. As adapted for the stage, with great warmth and more than a touch of hilarity, the hearts of children and adults alike still soar when the slipper fits.

  • Miss Nelson is Missing, based on the book by Henry Allard and James Marshall
  • February 17-19, 2012

The kids in Room 207 are the wildest, most rambunctious class in the entire elementary school. Their sweet teacher Miss Nelson doesn’t know what to do. She starts each new school year with a smile on her face, expecting an even better class than she had the year before. This year is different. This year is a nightmare. Poor Miss Nelson is out of ideas and on her way to a nervous breakdown, when suddenly she has a plan. The next day, the children arrive in class to find Miss Nelson has been replaced by Viola Swamp, the substitute no child ever wants to meet. She’s tough, strict, and never puts up with what she considers bad behavior. This hilarious classic follows Miss Swamp as she uses her idea of tough love to control the class, as well as the children’s attempts to find Miss Nelson before it’s too late for all of them.

  • Pride and Prejudice, based on the book by Jane Austen
  • March 30-April 1, 2012

Finding a husband is hardly Elizabeth Bennet’s most urgent priority. But with four sisters, an overzealous match-making mother, and a string of unsuitable suitors, it’s difficult to escape the subject. When the independent-minded Elizabeth meets the handsome but enigmatic Mr. Darcy, she is determined not to let her feelings triumph over her own good sense -- but the truth turns out to be slipperier than it seems. In a society where subtle snubs and deceit proliferate, is it possible for Elizabeth and Darcy to look beyond his pride and her prejudice, and to make the best match of all.

  • Young Directors Project
  • April 20-22, 2012

Two to three one-act plays will directed by Civic Youth Theatre young directors. This showcase gives our youth an opportunity to spread their wings and direct a show of their choosing. Titles will be announced in the spring 2012.

Announcing the 2011-2012 season: Summer and holiday shows


Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette will produce a summer show and a holiday show during the 2011-2012 season. Tickets to the general public are $18 for adults, $12 for seniors and $10 for youth age 18 and under. Tickets for Civic Theatre season ticket holders are $14 for adults, $8 for youth 18 and under.
  • Rent by Jonathan Larson
  • July 14-16, 2011
  • Tippecanoe County Amphitheater

Jonathan Larson’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Broadway musical is based loosely on Puccini’s opera La Bohème. It follows a year in the lives of seven friends living the disappearing Bohemian lifestyle in New York’s East Village. AIDS and both its physical and emotional complications pervade the lives of Roger, Mimi, Tom, and Angel; Maureen deals with her chronic infidelity through performance art; her partner, Joanne, wonders if their relationship is worth the trouble; Benjamin has sold out his Bohemian ideals in exchange for a hefty income and is on the outs with his former friends; and Mark, an aspiring filmmaker, feels like an outsider to life in general, always behind the camera recording the events but never playing a part.

  • The Honky Tonk Angels Holiday Spectacular by Ted Swindley
  • December 2-18, 2011

This holiday sequel to the hugely popular show, The Honky Tonk Angels continues the comic escapades of three good ole country gals as they reunite for a Christmas show like none other at "The Hillbilly Heaven Club" in Nashville. There are many surprising twists and turns in this musical comedy revue, including a gospel soul sister who also happens to be a psychic manicurist. Songs include a Motown Christmas medley, country classics like "Coat of Many Colors" by Dolly Parton and comedy hits such as "Grandma Got Run Over by a Reindeer."

Announcing the 2011-2012 Season: Staged Reading Series


Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette will produce 5 staged readings at the historic Monon Depot Theatre in downtown Lafayette during the 2011-2012 season. All staged readings are Pay What You Can events.
  • Ruined by Lynn Nottage
  • September 13, 2011

From Lynn Nottage, the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of such plays as Fabulation and Intimate Apparel, comes this haunting, probing work about the resilience of the human spirit during times of war. Set in a small mining town in Democratic Republic of Congo, this powerful play follows Mama Nadi, a shrewd businesswoman in a land torn apart by civil war. But is she protecting or profiting by the women she shelters? How far will she go to survive? Can a price be placed on a human life?

  • Anna in the Tropics by Nilo Cruz
  • November 8, 2011

Anna in the Tropics is a poignant and poetic play set in Florida in 1929 in a Cuban–American cigar factory, where cigars are still rolled by hand and "lectors" are employed to educate and entertain the workers. The arrival of a new lector is a cause for celebration, but when he begins to read aloud from Anna Karenina, he unwittingly becomes a catalyst in the lives of his avid listeners, for whom Tolstoy, the tropics and the American dream prove a volatile combination.

  • Farragut North by Beau Willimon
  • January 24, 2012

Stephen Bellamy is a wunderkind press secretary who has built a career that men twice his age would envy. During a tight presidential primary race, Stephen's meteoric rise falls prey to the backroom politics of more seasoned operatives. Farragut North is a timely story about the lust for power and the costs one will endure to achieve it.

  • World Premiere of Original Script(s) to be determined
  • March 6, 2012

In the five years the staged reading series has been part of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette, at least one has been an original, previously unproduced script by a playwright in the 14-county area served by the Tippecanoe Arts Federation:

  • 2007-2008: Pia Zadora Sings Gershwin by Deborah Gray and A Very Bad Day for Brandon Butterworth by Scott Haan
  • 2008-2009: In the Weeds by Steve Gooch
  • 2009-2010: TILT by Laurie Russell
  • 2010-2011: Roman Cokes by Jeff Spanke

The world premiere original script for the 2011-2012 season will be determined late in 2011.

  • Why Torture is Wrong, and the People Who Love Them by Christopher Durang
  • May 15, 2012

Christopher Durang turns political humor upside down with this raucous and provocative satire about America's growing homeland "insecurity." Why Torture is Wrong, and the People Who Love Them tells the story of a young woman suddenly in crisis: Is her new husband, whom she married when drunk, a terrorist? Or just crazy? Or both? Is her father's hobby of butterfly collecting really a cover for his involvement in a shadow government? Why does her mother enjoy going to the theatre so much? Does she seek mental escape, or is she insane? Honing in on our private terrors both at home and abroad, Durang oddly relieves our fears in this black comedy for an era of yellow, orange and red alerts.

The 2011-2012 season on jconline.com


Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette's 2011-2012 season has been announced in an article written by Tim Brouk in today's Journal & Courier, Lafayette and West Lafayette's daily newspaper. You can read the article here.

For more information about the shows in the 2011-2012 season or to order season tickets, call Civic Theatre at 765-423-7529 or visit its website.

Thursday, March 17, 2011

Seeking summer camp counselors, other assistants


Summer camp counselors and other assistants are being sought for the 2011 Young at Arts Civic Youth Theatre Summer Camps.

Camps include:
  • Improv R Us Camp, June 13-17, for students entering Grade 5 and above.
  • Musical Theatre & Drama Camp, June 20-24, for students entering Grades 2, 3 or 4.
  • Theatre Exploration Camp, June 27-July 1, for students entering Kindergarten or Grade 1.
  • The Music Man Jr. intensive four-week camp, July 5-July 29, for students between the ages of 9 and 18.

For more information, contact Managing Director Steve Koehler at 765-423-7529 or steve@lafayettecivic.org.

Wednesday, March 16, 2011

The Review is In: Out of Order


The review of Out of Order was published in the Journal & Courier, Lafayette and West Lafayette's daily newspaper. It was written by Amy Long. You can read it here.

Out of Order begins the second of its three-weekend run Friday at 7:30 p.m. and continues with shows at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday and 2:30 p.m. on Sunday. All performances take place at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette on the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette. The show closes March 27.

To inquire about tickets, call Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette at 765-423-7529 or visit its website.

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

Share Your Thoughts: Roman Cokes


The staged reading of Roman Cokes took place tonight at 7:30 p.m. at the historic Monon Depot Theatre in downtown Lafayette with 44 people in attendance.

As with other staged readings in the series, it was followed by a question-and-answer session between the audience, the playwright, Jeff Spanke, the cast and the director, Steve Martin.

Did you attend the staged reading? What did you think about the characters, the plot and other elements of the script? What were some of the high points? What will you remember most about this staged reading?

Sunday, March 13, 2011

The Staged Reading Series: Roman Cokes. Meet Jeff Spanke, the playwright.


Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette's Staged Reading Series includes at least one original, previously unproduced script in its season. This year's original script is Roman Cokes by Jeff Spanke.

Jeff teaches world literature, communications, film literature and reading at North Montgomery High School in Crawfordsville. He said his interest in playwriting comes from his passion for all forms of story telling.

"While oral communication remains, perhaps, my fallback, I wanted to experiment with the theatrical medium of narrative," Jeff said. "Since I can’t paint, and my golf game needs work, I figured this was the best use of my summer."

Q: Who are your favorite playwrights and why?
J.S.: I enjoy Bill Shakespeare, Neil Simon, Noel Coward, William Inge, and Tennessee Williams. Explaining why would be like trying to explain how awesome Paris was to someone who’s never been there: the futility of the task ultimately confounds the pursuit itself.

Q: What is the plot of Roman Cokes?
J.S.: The plot of this show isn’t as important as its execution. In truth, very little happens at all, save for an odd conflation of social-critique/who-done-it/classic redemption tale

Q: What was your process for writing Roman Cokes?
J.S.: I imagine that my “process” for writing Roman Cokes would sound an awful like someone’s process for raising a small child. Its conception was a wonderfully intimate and hopefully memorable experience. The gestation offered both times of great joy and growth, but also tremendous uncertainty, pain, and gas. At birth, I was instantly taken aback by the manifestation of months of hard work and sacrifice, but then, upon further glance, I noticed the odd array of blemishes, bruises, and other irrevocable imperfections. Its first steps signified an awkward beauty coupled with the hope for brighter, more sturdy future jaunts. With the ensuing weeks came a longing for a return to a simpler time, before obligations and parental dilemmas. Then came the potty training…you get the idea.

Q: What has the rehearsal process been like to date?
J.S.: Rehearsing for your own show is a lot like being schizophrenic: the voice doesn’t go away, you see things that aren’t there, you when nobody’s listening, and you find yourself publically defending/chastising figments of your untapped psyche. But, in the end, you can’t escape it because it’s who you are, and you are special.

Q: What are your thoughts on the staged reading series, as a whole?
J.S.: Honestly, I believe the staged reading series should not only continue, but should do so with the dedication and passion it deserves. It truly offers a unique opportunity to escape the theatrical confines of a set, costumes, and blocking, to sort of transcend the medium itself and expose the narrative for what it truly is. Staged readings should not be considered a “lighter” form of more conventional theater, but rather an entirely separate and equally valuable creative entity. And now you know the rest of the story.

Roman Cokes will be performed as a staged reading on Tuesday, March 15 at 7:30 p.m. in the historic Monon Depot Theatre at the corner of 5th Street and North Street. Audiences are suggested to pay what they can for admission.

Immediately following the reading, there will be a Q&A session between the audience, the playwright, the director and the cast.

Friday, March 11, 2011

In the Wings: Out of Order. Photos of the set.


The following photos show the set for Out of Order, the fourth production in the 2010-2011 MainStage season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. These photos of the set were taken in early March.
  • Set Design: John David Collier
  • Master Carpenter: Dave Lahr









Preview of the staged reading of Roman Cokes on jconline.com


A preview of the staged reading of Roman Cokes and a profile of playwright Jeff Spanke appear online at http://www.jconline.com, the website for the Journal & Courier, Lafayette and West Lafayette's daily newspaper.

You can read the preview here.

The staged reading of Roman Cokes will be held Tuesday, March 15 at 7:30 p.m. at the historic Monon Depot Theatre at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette. Audiences are encouraged to pay what they can for admission.

For more information about the staged reading, call Civic Theatre's office at 765-423-7529 or visit Civic Theatre's website.

Opening Night for Out of Order: production photos












Thanks to Kris Kazmierczak for taking these production photos.

Out of Order opens tonight, March 11, at 7:30 p.m. at the historic Monon Depot Theatre on the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette. The show will run three consecutive weekends through Sunday, March 27.

To order tickets, call Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette at 765-423-7529 or visit its website.

Thursday, March 10, 2011

Civic Theatre on YouTube: Out of Order


The following preview of Out of Order, the fourth production of the 2010-2011 MainStage season, has been added to the Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette channel on YouTube.

Thanks to Steve Scherer for creating this video.



Out of Order opens Friday, March 11 and runs three consecutive weekends through Sunday, March 27. For more information about the show or to order tickets, call Civic Theatre at 765-423-7529 or visit its website.

Preview of Out of Order on jconline.com


A preview of Out of Order appears online at http://www.jconline.com/, the website for the Journal & Courier, Lafayette and West Lafayette's daily newspaper.

You can read the preview here.

Out of Order opens tomorrow, Friday, March 11 and runs three consecutive weekends through Sunday, March 27 at the historic Monon Depot Theatre at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette.

For more information about the show or to order tickets, call Civic Theatre's office at 765-423-7529 or visit Civic Theatre's website.