Tuesday, May 29, 2012

One Size Fits All Improv at Civic Theatre, June 2


One Size Fits All Improv returns to the historic Monon Depot Theatre for a competitive improv comedy show Saturday, June 2 at 7:30 p.m.

The show is fun for all ages, tickets are $5.00 per person either at the door or in advance by calling Civic Theatre at 765-423-PLAY (7529).

Two teams compete for points and spectacular prizes, the audience suggests topics, an M.C. calls the plays, and volunteers may even join us in the fun on stage!

Visit One Size Fits All's Facebook page and vote on which game will start the show.


Sunday, May 27, 2012

Share Your Thoughts: Tartuffe, or The Impostor


Now that Tartuffe, or The Impostor, has closed, share your thoughts about the production.

What will you remember about the show? What were your thoughts about the performances? The story and theme? The design? What were the standout moments?

Friday, May 25, 2012

Reviewing the 2011-2012 Season: Staged Reading Series


The 2011-2012 Staged Reading Series at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette ended Tuesday, May 15 with Laurie Russell's Puzzles. The entire season was:

  • Ruined by Lynn Nottage, directed by Bill Caise
  • Why Torture is Wrong, and the People Who Love Them by Christopher Durang, directed by Arliss Jeffries
  • Farragut North by Beau Willimon, directed by Neil Radtke
  • Puzzles by Laurie Russell, directed by Tom Long
What did you think about the scripts in this year's Staged Reading Series?

What were some of the highlights in this year's Staged Reading Series?

Which staged reading was your favorite?

What staged reading(s) are you looking forward to in the 2012-2013 Staged Reading Series?

Wednesday, May 23, 2012

Save the Date: Civic Theatre Annual Meeting and Celebration on June 26



Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette will host its Annual Meeting and Celebration on Tuesday, June 26 at 5:30 p.m. in the lobby of the historic Monon Depot Theatre. All members are welcome to attend, reminisce about the past season and look forward to the next.

Members also will vote on the proposed Board of Directors roster for the 2012-2013 season.

Please contact Civic Theatre’s office at 765-423-PLAY (7529) if you plan to attend, so refreshments can be planned and ordered.

This meeting is not the End-of-Season Volunteer Apprecation Dinner, where Rising Star, Shining Star and the Newell Scholarship awards are presented. An announcement about that event will be made soon.


Sue Lakin serves as the convener of the Board Governance Committee.

Tuesday, May 22, 2012

Tartuffe - Directors Notes

A director comes to a show with a vision.  That vision can be based on instinct, or lots of thought and research, usually a mix of both methods.  Jeff Spanke, director of the currently running comedy, Tartuffe, has written a wonderful note reflecting on his vision for the production.  Tartuffe runs for one more weekend, seats are available, here or by calling 765.723.7529.  Please enjoy Jeff's thoughts, and then come and enjoy this wonderful show.


Director’s Note:
Hello. Thank you for coming. It’s good to see you. Before we begin, however, I feel inclined to tell you that the events in which you will be shortly partaking are, sadly, against the law and punishable by death.
Well, at least they were in 1664. Tartuffe’s original publication sparked such a widespread controversy among members of the French Roman Catholic Church, the French aristocracy, and, despite its appeal to the public, King Louis XVI himself, that the crown threatened excommunication or death to anyone who performed in, saw, or even read the work. The cause behind the play’s controversy rested in Moliere’s uncomfortable blurring of vice and virtue, which, as the King would declare, “could be mistaken for each other; although one does not doubt the good intentions of the author, even so [I] forbid it in public…in order not to allow it to be abused by others, less capable of making a just discernment of it.”
In other words, this play exploits the hypocrisy of those who claim to embrace piety, but really seek nothing more than worldly gain. Nevertheless, Moliere didn’t intend to condemn the Crown or the Church, but rather strove merely to make people examine, “all the lying, disguise, cheating, dissimulation, all outward show different from the reality, all contradiction in fact between actions that proceed from a single source…incongruity is the heart of the comic.”
Therefore, in keeping with Moliere’s pursuit of distinguishing the rational from the irrational, I decided to set his play in a time during our nation’s history when nostalgia and virtue seem to have masked neurosis and vice: the 1950s. As a child of the 90s, I remember always thinking that the 1950s were a time of peace and harmony: an age of endless summer days and barbecue-filled nights, when nothing bad ever happened and white, Christian, heterosexual people mowed lawns in denim jeans, vacuumed in pearls, and smoked cigarettes in hospital operating rooms. Yeah, those were the days.
When I was a kid, I remember watching the news at night and getting scared at all of the stories of rain forest depletion, bombings in Kosovo, impending panda extinction, O-Zone destruction, divorce, car wrecks, terror, diseased pork, fatal bug-bites, oil spills, and DEATH. Then, I remember wishing that we could return to a time when no one ever was killed, men and women stayed married, there was no war, no one was scared, and white people and black people lived together in utopian tranquility.
But then I started school. And I read books. And I saw movies. And I learned about things like racism, sexism, ageism, riots, Red Scares, Black Lists, Cold Wars, Korea, missile drills, and bus boycotts. And as quickly as they formed, my idyllic views of the 1950s banished into obscurity alongside POGS and the last two seasons of Happy Days.
In truth, the 1950s were anything but idyllic. People were paranoid, anxious, and unsure of what the future held. Yet, for some reason this decade remains mythically sandwiched in the middle of the bloodiest century in world history: an isolated, harmonious oasis couched in a nostalgic innocence that never existed.
And therein lies the essence of Moliere’s play: separating the rational from the irrational, the vice from the virtue. I sincerely hope you enjoy our little production and that you appreciate the talents and efforts of everyone involved. As my mainstage directorial debut, I have truly enjoyed this entire process. On behalf of Lafayette Civic Theater and the full company, thank you for coming to Tartuffe.
Cheers,
Jeff Spanke


Tuesday, May 15, 2012

Share Your Thoughts: Puzzles


The staged reading of Puzzles took place tonight at 7:30 p.m. at the historic Monon Depot Theatre in downtown Lafayette with 102 people in attendance.

As with other staged readings in the series, it was followed by a question-and-answer session between the audience, the playwright, Laurie Russell, the cast and the director, Tom Long.

Did you attend the staged reading? What did you think about the characters, the plot and other elements of the script? What were some of the high points? What will you remember most about this staged reading?

The Review is In: Tartuffe



The review of Tartuffe was published in the Journal & Courier, Lafayette and West Lafayette's daily newspaper. It was written by Taya Flores.

You can read the review here.

Tartuffe has two more weekends of performances at the historic Monon Depot Theatre at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette. Friday and Saturday shows are at 7:30 p.m., Sunday shows are at 2:30 p.m.

Tickets are $18 for adults, $15 for senior citizens and $10 for youth age 18 and under.

To order tickets, call Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette at 765-423-PLAY (7529) or visit its website.


The Staged Reading Series: Puzzles. Meet Laurie Russell, the playwright.


During Civic Theatre's Staged Reading Series, at least one script written by a local playwright will make its world debut. This year's original script is Puzzles by Laurie Russell, who also wrote the script for the staged reading of TILT in the 2009-2010 season.

Question: Why did you want to write Puzzles?
Laurie Russell: I spent a week with my mother and two of her 80-some-odd-year-old friends in Seattle. Here were three women who had been friends since kindergarten. My mother doesn't hear well, one doesn't walk well and the other drove like a crazy woman. I wanted to write something about older people who are still sharp, they're witty and fun to be with. I also wanted a fish out of water story, so that's why I threw in the teenager with the old folks. And I also wanted a play that did a show within a show. It really kind of wrote itself – I write characters who have their own little lives.

Q: When and where is the action set?
L.R.: I like taking a room and making it the set, that I have to work within that framework and people come and go. In Puzzles, the set is the rec room of the Lazy Days Retirement Home. It begins with an obnoxious couple visiting the home; they're getting divorced and they need someplace for their daughter to be. The director of the home doesn't want to take the teenager, but the family offers to buy a copy machine.

Q: How many characters are there?
L.R.: There are 15 characters in total, but it's mostly about Lily, the teenager, and this cranky, bitchy old lady named Mia. There's a conflict of worlds, and neither is very happy with where they are in their lives and what's going on. So they butt heads.

Q: What was the process of writing Puzzles?
L.R.: I usually know where I want to start and where I want to end. But I have a bad habit of writing some and going over it and over it and over it and fixing it. And then writing some more and going over it and over it and fixing it. And then I'll skip ahead and move back. It took me about a year to write Puzzles.

Q: How was writing Puzzles different from writing TILT?
L.R.: TILT was more personal. I certainly used from my life and attitudes in both plays, but TILT was more personal.

Q: What do you hope to get out of the staged reading of Puzzles?
L.R.: The same thing as TILT: the audience reaction, which allows for revisions. I can see if some dialogue is a dud. Also I can get their feedback when everything is said and done.

Q: What do you think about Civic Theatre's staged reading series?
L.R.: I love the staged reading series, but I wish more people would come. I think we offer a nice variety of shows that people may not be aware of. The best response would be for an audience member to say, "Oh, I saw that as a staged reading at Civic and now it's a production at IRT."

The staged reading of Puzzles will be held tonight, May 15, at 7:30 p.m. in the historic Monon Depot Theatre at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette. It is a Pay What You Can event.

There will be a question-and-answer session immediately following between the audience, the cast, the director and the playwright.


Friday, May 11, 2012

Opening Night: Tartuffe. Preview on jconline.com


A preview of Tartuffe appears online at http://www.jconline.com, the website for the Journal & Courier, Greater Lafayette's daily newspaper.

You can read the preview here.

Tartuffe opens tonight and runs three weekends through Sunday, May 27 at the historic Monon Depot Theatre in downtown Lafayette.

Tickets are $18 for adults, $15 for seniors and $10 for youth age 18 and under.

For more information about the show or to order tickets, call Civic Theatre's office at 765-423-PLAY (7529) or visit its website.


Civic Theatre on YouTube: Tartuffe


The following preview of Tartuffe, the fifth show in the 2011-2012 MainStage season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette, has been added to the Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette channel on YouTube.

Thanks to Steve Scherer for creating this video.


Tartuffe opens tonight and runs three consecutive weekends through Sunday, May 27 at the historic Monon Depot Theatre at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette.

Tickets are $18 for adults, $15 for seniors and $10 for youth age 18 and under.

For more information about the show or to order tickets, call Civic Theatre's office at 765-423-PLAY (7529) or visit Civic Theatre's website.

Opening Night: Tartuffe. Photos of the set.


The following photos show the set for Tartuffe, the fifth production of the 2011-2012 MainStage season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. The photos were taken in early May.








Wednesday, May 9, 2012

The Staged Reading Series: Puzzles on May 15







The final script in the 2011-2012 Staged Reading Series at CivicTheatre of Greater Lafayette is Puzzles, an original script written by Laurie Russell.

Tom Long directs the cast, which includes Cindy Modlin Adams, Mary Anne Cecil, Camilla Cripps, Rod Dimmick, Linda Erwin, Gerriann Fish, Ce-Ce Furtner, Jane Hoaks, Linda Jeffries, Thomas Losey, Tamzin Malone, Rozella Mears, Marisa Simmons, Kristen Singleton, Cicely Ward and Sarah Weaver.

Lily’s parents are getting a divorce, and she is not taking it well. To keep Lily out of trouble, her parents make a deal with the neighboring senior home: they will purchase a new copier for the residence if Lily can work there eight weeks. Lily interacts with the residents and is cast in the senior home's annual play directed by the former Rantoul Civic Theatre Director, Mrs. Custenboarder.

The staged reading of Puzzles will take place Tuesday, May 15 at 7:30 p.m. in the historic Monon Depot Theatre in downtown Lafayette. There will be a question-and-answer session between the audience, cast, director and playwright immediately following the reading.

Audience members are encouraged to pay what they can for admission.

To learn more about Puzzles or the Staged Reading Series, call Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette at 765-423-PLAY (7529) or visit its website.




Friday, May 4, 2012

In the Wings: Tartuffe. Meet Timothy Devery.


Timothy Devery plays Tartuffe in Tartuffe, the fifth show in the 2011-2012 MainStage season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. The script is by Molière.

Question: Why did you want to be involved with Tartuffe?
Timothy Devery: I really enjoy how humorous the script is. It's over-the-top in the best of ways.

Q: Who is Tartuffe?
T.D.: Tartuffe is not as he seems. The play is called Tartuffe, or the Impostor, so you can assume that he's an impostor. Everyone hates him except Orgon, played by Doug Pruim. Tartuffe is taking Orgon for all he's worth.

Q: What do you think an audience will enjoy about the show?
T.D.: The way we're going balls to the wall with these practically stereotypical characterizations. There's no way not to be entertained.

Q: Have you ever conned or been conned?
T.D.: Maybe.

Tartuffe opens Friday, May 11 and runs through Sunday, May 27 at the historic Monon Depot Theatre at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette.

Friday and Saturday shows begin at 7:30 p.m. Sunday shows begin at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $18 for adults, $15 for seniors and $10 for youth age 18 and under.

For more information about the show or to order tickets, call 765-423-PLAY (7529) or visit Civic Theatre's website.


In the Wings: Tartuffe. Meet Doug Pruim.


Doug Pruim plays Orgon in Tartuffe, the fifth show in the 2011-2012 MainStage season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. The script is by Molière.

Question: Why did you want to be involved with Tartuffe?
Doug Pruim: I played Orgon when I was in college at Trinity Christian College in Palos Heights, Illinois, in 1997. I saw a Civic Theatre Facebook post regarding auditions for Tartuffe and I was excited to audition because I had a good time with the other production.

Q: Who is Orgon?
D.P.: Orgon is the head of the household. He really is in love with himself but he has weird insecurities and has fallen in love with this guy he met at church named Tartuffe, played by Timothy Devery. Nobody else seems to like Tartuffe, but Orgon loves him.

Q: What do you think an audience will enjoy about the show?
D.P.: This is a lot of silly fun, and it's fun to watch how blind Orgon is to the sleazy character of Tartuffe. There is a lot of witty wordplay between the characters.

Q: Have you ever conned or been conned?
D.P.: I'm sure that I probably have, but I don't remember what it was. And if I did it, I was probably pretty bad at it.

Tartuffe opens Friday, May 11 and runs through Sunday, May 27 at the historic Monon Depot Theatre at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette.

Friday and Saturday shows begin at 7:30 p.m. Sunday shows begin at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $18 for adults, $15 for seniors and $10 for youth age 18 and under.

For more information about the show or to order tickets, call 765-423-PLAY (7529) or visit Civic Theatre's website.


In the Wings: Tartuffe. Meet Rachel Thibault.


Rachel Thibault plays Elmire in Tartuffe, the fifth show in the 2011-2012 MainStage season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. The script is by Molière.

Question: Why did you want to be involved with Tartuffe?
Rachel Thibault: I wanted to move to a bigger challenge from the roles I've had before.

Q: Who is Elmire?
R.T.: Elmire is Orgon's second wife and Madame Pernelle's daughter-in-law. I've created in my head that Orgon is her sugar daddy, so she sticks with him because he's got the dough. I've always thought that Elmire is the sane one in the family.

Q: What do you think an audience will enjoy most about the show?
R.T.: It would probably be the physical interactions between the characters.

Q: Have you ever conned or been conned?
R.T.: I'd like to plead the fifth.

Tartuffe opens Friday, May 11 and runs through Sunday, May 27 at the historic Monon Depot Theatre at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette.

Friday and Saturday shows begin at 7:30 p.m. Sunday shows begin at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $18 for adults, $15 for seniors and $10 for youth age 18 and under.

For more information about the show or to order tickets, call 765-423-PLAY (7529) or visit Civic Theatre's website.



Thursday, May 3, 2012

In the Wings: Tartuffe. Meet Gary McFall.


Gary McFall plays Cléante in Tartuffe, the fifth show in the 2011-2012 MainStage season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. The script is by Molière.

Question: Why did you want to be involved with Tartuffe?
Gary McFall: I've wanted to be in a Civic play for a long time, but haven't been able to because of work. I was able to carve some time from work to be in this show.

Q: Who is Cléante?
G.M.: Cléante is Elmire's brother, and Orgon's brother-in-law and very good friend. He's a slacker and a slob; he enjoys living on Orgon's dime. It's funny that Orgon calls Cléante "the Cato of the present age," which makes me think of Kato Kaelin from the O.J. Simpson case, who was just another hanger-on.

Q: What do you think an audience will enjoy most about the show?
G.M.: We try to connect it with current times; it was written more than 400 years ago. There are connections with the way people behave now: people who are hangers-on, people who spout their opinions, parents who are controlling over their children.

Q: Have you ever conned or been conned?
G.M.: Been conned, absolutely. A gentleman convinced me that he knew everything about being a building contractor, and he was my contractor on a project that went bad really fast.

Tartuffe opens Friday, May 11 and runs through Sunday, May 27 at the historic Monon Depot Theatre at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette.

Friday and Saturday shows begin at 7:30 p.m. Sunday shows begin at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $18 for adults, $15 for seniors and $10 for youth age 18 and under.

For more information about the show or to order tickets, call 765-423-PLAY (7529) or visit Civic Theatre's website.


In the Wings: Tartuffe. Meet Andrea Badger Yough.


Andrea Badger Yough plays Dorine in Tartuffe, the fifth show in the 2011-2012 MainStage season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. The script is by Molière.

Question: Why did you want to be involved with Tartuffe?
Andrea Badger Yough: I enjoy theater and I was involved with another Molière show, The Miser, in college. I decided it was a good chance to get back involved with theater.

Q: Who is Dorine?
A.B.Y.: Dorine is the family maid. She makes sure that the mother and daughter of the house are taken care of. She knows everything that is going on and tries to look out for them as she directs behavior around her.

Q: What do you think an audience will enjoy most about the show?
A.B.Y.: Jeff Spanke, the director, is incorporating a lot of humor that will bring the script to life. It's been around since the 1600's, and it can be flat without adding things to it.

Tartuffe opens Friday, May 11 and runs through Sunday, May 27 at the historic Monon Depot Theatre at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette.

Friday and Saturday shows begin at 7:30 p.m. Sunday shows begin at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $18 for adults, $15 for seniors and $10 for youth age 18 and under.

For more information about the show or to order tickets, call 765-423-PLAY (7529) or visit Civic Theatre's website.



Wednesday, May 2, 2012

In the Wings: Tartuffe. Meet Jennifer Dye.


Jennifer Dye plays Mariane in Tartuffe, the fifth show in the 2011-2012 MainStage season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. The script is by Molière.

Question: Why did you want to be involved with Tartuffe?
Jennifer Dye: I had just moved back into the area from Evansville, and I've been out of theater for a long time and was missing it. I saw that there were auditions so I tried out.

Q: Who is Mariane?
J.D.: Mariane is Orgon's daughter and she is engaged to Valère, played by Nelson Tilley. Her father tells her that she will be married to Tartuffe, so she becomes engaged in getting rid of Tartuffe.

Q: What do you think an audience will enjoy most about the show?
J.D.: They will enjoy the comic aspects of it, especially the actions. This kind of a story could happen to anyone.

Q: Have you ever conned or been conned?
J.D.: Yes on both. I used to con my mom all the time into letting me stay out late.

Tartuffe opens Friday, May 11 and runs through Sunday, May 27 at the historic Monon Depot Theatre at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette.

Friday and Saturday shows begin at 7:30 p.m. Sunday shows begin at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $18 for adults, $15 for seniors and $10 for youth age 18 and under.

For more information about the show or to order tickets, call 765-423-PLAY (7529) or visit Civic Theatre's website.



In the Wings: Tartuffe. Meet Nelson Tilley.


Nelson Tilley plays Valère in Tartuffe, the fifth show in the 2011-2012 MainStage season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. The script is by Molière.

Question: Why did you want to be involved with Tartuffe?
Nelson Tilley: I had never performed a classic play like this. I wanted to keep acting and not take a break.

Q: Who is Valère?
N.T.: Valère is promised to be Mariane's fiancé by Orgon. His goal is to keep her his and marry her.

Q: What do you think an audience will enjoy most about the show?
N.T.:  Jeff Spanke is a wonderful director and has done a great job with the show. Doug Pruim, who plays Orgon, is a phenomenal actor. I think the audience will enjoy the comedic timing and action. It's all really funny.

Q: Have you ever conned or been conned?
N.T.: I have been conned and tricked into things before, yes.

Tartuffe opens Friday, May 11 and runs through Sunday, May 27 at the historic Monon Depot Theatre at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette.

Friday and Saturday shows begin at 7:30 p.m. Sunday shows begin at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $18 for adults, $15 for seniors and $10 for youth age 18 and under.

For more information about the show or to order tickets, call 765-423-PLAY (7529) or visit Civic Theatre's website.




Tuesday, May 1, 2012

In the Wings: Tartuffe. Meet Nate Shumate.


Nate Shumate plays Damis in Tartuffe, the fifth show in the 2011-2012 MainStage season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. The script is by Molière.

Question: Why did you want to be involved with Tartuffe?
Nate Shumate: Timothy Devery, who plays Tartuffe, is one of my friends who also was in Red Hot and Cole, and I had never before worked with Jeff Spanke, the director. I saw Jeff in RENT and was very impressed.

Q: Who is Damis?
N.S.: Damis is Orgon's son. He wants to please his father, but he's very angry all the time. He's short-tempered about everything.

Q: What do you think an audience will enjoy most about the show?
N.S.: It's going to be funny. I'm very excited.

Q: Have you ever conned or been conned?
N.S.: Maybe a little bit. I've done some conning, I used to rip off my cousin for football cards. And I'm an older sibling, so that is my job at home.

Tartuffe opens Friday, May 11 and runs through Sunday, May 27 at the historic Monon Depot Theatre at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette.

Friday and Saturday shows begin at 7:30 p.m. Sunday shows begin at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $18 for adults, $15 for seniors and $10 for youth age 18 and under.

For more information about the show or to order tickets, call 765-423-PLAY (7529) or visit Civic Theatre's website.



In the Wings: Tartuffe. Meet Amy Long.


Amy Long plays Madame Pernelle in Tartuffe, the fifth show in the 2011-2012 MainStage season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. The script is by Molière.

Question: Why did you want to be involved with Tartuffe?
Amy Long: I was ready to be involved with Civic. The last time I was involved was a year ago, and I had a blast. I wanted to do more.

Q: Who is Madame Pernelle?
A.L.: Madame Pernelle is Orgon's mother; he is the father of the house, so she is in some ways the matriarch. In other ways she clearly is not because she's crazy, batty and off-kilter. The other characters merely tolerate her. She goes off on rants and people pay no attention to her. She and Orgon are the only family members who are in love with Tartuffe. Everyone else suspects he is up to no good.

Q: What do you think an audience will enjoy most about the show?
A.L.: The audience will think, "The script was written in the 1600's and it's still so funny!" Jeff Spanke, the director, has done a brilliant job helping us unravel the lines and make sense of them and put them all together in a show that is really funny and witty and fun to watch.

Q: Have you ever conned or been conned?
A.L.: I am not a good con artist. I've been told that everything that I'm thinking plays across my face and in my body language. I have a hard time getting away with lies because whatever I'm thinking oozes out of me.

Tartuffe opens Friday, May 11 and runs through Sunday, May 27 at the historic Monon Depot Theatre at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette.

Friday and Saturday shows begin at 7:30 p.m. Sunday shows begin at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $18 for adults, $15 for seniors and $10 for youth age 18 and under.

For more information about the show or to order tickets, call 765-423-PLAY (7529) or visit Civic Theatre's website.