Friday, March 29, 2013

Preview on jconline.com: The "3-for-1" show on Saturday, March 30


Three Greater Lafayette improv comedy groups will be performing Saturday, March 30 at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette during the "3-for-1" show.

Ad Liberation, The Ship of Fools and One Size Fits All Improv each will perform 25-30 minutes of their own comedy beginning at 7:30 p.m. The show will end with a game that includes all performers who appeared on stage that evening.

A preview of the show is on jconline.com, the website of the Journal & Courier, Greater Lafayette's daily newspaper. You can read the preview here.

General admission tickets can be reserved by calling 765-423-PLAY (7529), or they can be picked up at the theatre the night of the show. Tickets are $5.00 per person, and the show will be fun for audience members of all ages.

Laugh yourself silly at Civic Theatre this Saturday night with improv comedy from three of the Greater Lafayette area's favorite improv groups!

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Layette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.

Thursday, March 28, 2013

Community Calendar Posting Party (and Pizza!) on March 30


Have you wanted to help promote the shows at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette, but didn't know how to start or what to do?

You've got your chance Saturday, March 30 during the Community Calendar Posting Party (and Pizza!) at the Civic Theatre office, 313 N. 5th Street in downtown Lafayette.

There are a lot of online calendars in town - the Journal & Courier, WLFI, WBAA to name just a few. Generally, Civic Theatre's staff populates as many as they can, but not all of them. If you are able to lend a few hours on Saturday afternoon, that could change!

From 1 p.m. until the task is complete, volunteers will gather at the Civic office to populate each calendar in the region. Passwords, text, dates and other vital information will be provided ... along with pizza!

Please bring your laptop computer with you - and then dig in to have a fun time with other volunteers talking about the season and sharing it with tens of thousands of residents of the Greater Lafayette area.

If you have questions, call 765-423-PLAY (7529) or e-mail steve@lafayettecivic.org for more information.

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

Announcing auditions: The Break of Noon



Director Denise Laussade has announced audition information for The Break of Noon, the final staged reading in the 2012-2013 Staged Reading Series at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. The script is by Neil LaBute.

Auditions will be Sunday, April 7 and Monday, April 8 from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Appointments are suggested, please call Civic Theatre at 765-423-PLAY (7529) to schedule.

The subject matter is suitable for mature audiences.

Denise is seeking to cast three men and four women:

* John - male, middle-aged
* Lawyer - male, fifties
* Host - female, thirties
* Ginger - female, middle-aged
* Diva Midnight - female, twenties
* Detective - male, forties
* Jessie - female, middle-aged

Amidst the chaos and horror of the worst office shooting in American history, John Smith sees the face of God. His modern-day revelation creates a maelstrom of disbelief among everyone he knows. A newcomer to faith, John urgently searches for a modern response to the age-old question: at what cost salvation?

The staged reading of The Break of Noon will be Tuesday, May 7 at 7:30 p.m. at the historic Monon Depot Theatre in downtown Lafayette. It is a Pay What You Can Event.

There will be a question-and-answer session immediately following between the audience, cast and director.

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.

Sunday, March 24, 2013

Soliciting submissions for the 2013 10-Minute Play Festival


Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette and the Civic Playwrights Group are looking for area playwrights to submit previously unproduced scripts through mid-April. Up to eight scripts will be produced in the inaugural 10-Minute Play Festival on June 21-22, 2013, at the historic Monon Depot Theatre in downtown Lafayette.

* Scripts should be submitted to 10minute@themediacollective.org.

* Residents from the 14-county Tippecanoe Arts Federation area are welcome to submit scripts. These counties include Benton, Carroll, Cass, Clinton, Fountain, Howard, Jasper, Montgomery, Newton, Pulaski, Tippecanoe, Tipton, Warren and White.

* The submission deadline is April 10, 2013.

* Writers of all ages and experience levels are encouraged to submit.

* There are no limits on the number of scripts a writer can submit, and genres of all types are encouraged.

* Scripts must be no longer than 10 pages, and only complete scripts should be submitted: no synopses with sample dialogue or proposals, please.

* Submissions must not have been produced before, either as full productions, workshops, or staged readings.

* The 2013 10-Minute Play Festival will include full productions of no more than eight 10-minute scripts.

* There are no royalties paid at this time.

Do you want to be involved with the Festival, but don't want to write a script? Civic Theatre and the Civic Playwrights Group also are looking for people who want to act in the 10-Minute Play Festival or help in whatever way they can. Please contact 10minute@themediacollective.org for more information or call Civic Theatre at 765-423-PLAY (7529).

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.

Saturday, March 23, 2013

Share Your Thoughts: The Fox on the Fairway



Now that The Fox on the Fairway has closed, share your thoughts about the production.

What will you remember about the show? What were your thoughts about the performances? The story and themes? The design? What were the standout moments?

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.

Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Civic Theatre Needs You! ... coming today


Do you want to learn more about Civic Theatre's Board of Directors, its Advisory Council or committees?

Visit Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette at 5:30 p.m. today (Wednesday, March 20) to mingle and network with current Board members, learn their rights and responsibilities to the organization, and how you and your expertise can benefit the organization as it looks to the future.

The Civic Theatre Needs You event is free and open to the public. Food will be provided by Adelino's Old World Kitchen, and Civic Comedy Readers and One Size Fits All Improv will provide entertainment. Presentations will be made about the following committees:

* Board Governance
* Development
* Facilities
* Finance
* Production Delivery
* Public Relations
* Volunteer

Steve Koehler, managing director, is also scheduled to speak.

Although walk-ins are welcome, an RSVP is appreciated by calling 765-423-PLAY (7529) or emailing steve@lafayettecivic.org

For more than 80 years, Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette has strengthened Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational programming. The Board of Directors is looking forward to the next 80 years. Will you join us?

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

Share Your Thoughts: Going Through Hell


The staged reading of Going Through Hell by Steve Martin took place tonight at 7:30 p.m. in the historic Monon Depot Theatre in downtown Lafayette with 102 people in attendance. It was the play's world premiere.

The reading was followed by a question-and-answer session between the audience, the cast, the playwright and the director, Kelly McBurnette-Andronicos.

Did you attend the staged reading? What did you think about the characters, the plot and the dialogue? What were some of the high points? What do you think the playwright's next steps might be in developing the play? What will you remember about this staged reading?

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.


The Staged Reading Series: Going Through Hell on March 19.











The sixth staged reading of the 2012-2013 Staged Reading Series at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is Going Through Hell by Steve Martin. It is one of two scripts written by local playwrights that will receive their world premiere in the 2012-2013 season.

Kelly McBurnette-Andronicos directs the cast, which includes Steven Lincoln, Jeremiah Dole, Timothy Lewis, Kristen Singleton, Eric Francis, Laurie Russell, Nathan Bechtold and Mary Beth Weckerlin.

The staged reading of Going Through Hell will be Tuesday, March 19 at 7:30 p.m. in the historic Monon Depot Theatre at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette. It is a Pay What You Can event; general admission tickets are available the night of the staged reading.

There will be a question-and-answer session between the audience, the director, the cast and the playwright immediately following.

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.

Monday, March 18, 2013

Share Your Thoughts: A Wonderful Suicide


The staged reading of A Wonderful Suicide by Diane Littleton Bahler took place tonight at 7:30 p.m. in the historic Monon Depot Theatre in downtown Lafayette with 94 people in attendance. It was the play's world premiere.

The reading was followed by a question-and-answer session between the audience, the cast, the playwright and the director, Kevin Colby.

Did you attend the staged reading? What did you think about the characters, the plot and the dialogue? What were some of the high points? What do you think the playwright's next steps might be in developing the play? What will you remember about this staged reading?

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.

The Staged Reading Series: A Wonderful Suicide on March 18.













The fifth staged reading of the 2012-2013 Staged Reading Series at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is A Wonderful Suicide by Diane Littleton Bahler. It is one of two scripts written by local playwrights that will receive their world premiere in the 2012-2013 season.

Kevin Colby directs the cast, which includes Gavin Pugh, Greg Seiters, Josie Luptak, Lyle Janney, John-Michael Mulesa, George Brines, Trevor Scott, Heather Bungard-Janney, Perry Kirkham, Lev Gorenstein and Jennifer Luptak.

The staged reading of A Wonderful Suicide will be Monday, March 18 at 7:30 p.m. in the historic Monon Depot Theatre at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette. It is a Pay What You Can event; general admission tickets are available the night of the staged reading.

There will be a question-and-answer session between the audience, the director, the cast and the playwright immediately following the reading.

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.


Sunday, March 17, 2013

The Staged Reading Series: A Wonderful Suicide and Going Through Hell. Preview on jconline.com


A preview of the staged readings of A Wonderful Suicide and Going Through Hell appears online at www.jconline.com, the website of the Journal & Courier, Greater Lafayette's daily newspaper.

You can read the preview here.

The staged reading of A Wonderful Suicide will be Monday, March 18. The staged reading of Going Through Hell will be Tuesday, March 19. Both will be held at the historic Monon Depot Theatre at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette. They begin at 7:30 p.m. Each staged reading is followed immediately by a question-and-answer session between the audience, the director, the cast and the playwright.

These are Pay What You Can events; general admission tickets can be picked up at the theatre on the nights of the staged readings.

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.

Friday, March 15, 2013

The Staged Reading Series: Going Through Hell. Meet Kelly McBurnette-Andronicos, the director.




Kelly McBurnette-Andronicos directs Going Through Hell, the sixth staged reading of the 2012-2013 Staged Reading Series at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. The script is by Steve Martin. It will receive its world premiere Tuesday, March 19 at 7:30 p.m.

Question: Why did you want to direct Going Through Hell?
Kelly McBurnette-Andronicos: I've been watching it develop since last summer, and offered some feedback to the playwright I think was helpful. Once you offer feedback, especially extensive feedback, you develop a more intimate relationship with a script than you would with just a casual reading. It's like a kid. It's not my kid. It's the neighbor's kid. I didn't create him, but I still care about him and want him to do well in life.

Q: What is your working relationship like with Steve Martin?
K.McB.-A.: He's like the mom next door. Her kid has come over for a sleepover. She keeps looking out the window, making sure our house hasn't burned down. I wave and smile reassuringly.

Q: What has been the process of making Going Through Hell a staged reading?
K.McB.-A.: I have a strong opinion about what a staged reading is and isn't. A staged reading is a critical step in a play's development and precedes a production. My goal, and the purpose of a staged reading, is to put the play in context for the playwright so that he/she can hear the flow of the play and see where changes and tweaks might be needed. The focus is on dialogue and plot. I've also packaged it for the audience, who participates in the same way by offering valuable insight through the talkbacks. The biggest benefit is having actors inhabit the roles. They are able to sniff out all manner of inconsistencies and contradictions about their characters because they necessarily see only through their characters' eyes, whereas the writer and director have a global view. This is very helpful. The actors kind of work like pipe cleaners in that way.

Q: What is the story of Going Through Hell?
K.McB.-A.: Love is found. Love is lost. Love is followed to the ends of Hell.

Q: What will an audience enjoy during the staged reading?
K.McB.-A.: The whiplash from that sharp turn they didn't see coming.

Q: What else would you like to say?
K.McB.-A.: New plays are like Lotto tickets to American theatres. You don't know which one's going to be a winner, so you should buy up as many as you can, stage as many as you can. I commend Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette for providing this venue for two new locally written plays.

The staged reading of Going Through Hell will be Tuesday, March 19 at 7:30 p.m. at the historic Monon Depot Theatre at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette. It is a Pay What You Can event.

There will be a question-and-answer session immediately following between the audience, the cast, the director and the playwright.

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.

Thursday, March 14, 2013

The Staged Reading Series: A Wonderful Suicide. Meet Kevin Colby, the director.



Kevin Colby directs A Wonderful Suicide, the fifth staged reading of the 2012-2013 Staged Reading Series at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. The script is by Diane Littleton Bahler. It will receive its world premiere Monday, March 18 at 7:30 p.m.

Question: Why did you want to direct A Wonderful Suicide?
Kevin Colby: From my work with Civic Theatre's Tour of Terror, I was very familiar with the historic events Diane's play is based upon. When I read it, I was really taken with both the accuracy of detail and the unique structure of the story.

Q: What is your working relationship with Diane like?
K.C.: I've tried to present things in a way that captures Diane's vision for this, and Diane has been very receptive to feedback from the actors and me about the script. I think we've been able to work quite well together.

Q: What has been the process of turning A Wonderful Suicide into a staged reading?
K.C.: In many ways, the script lends itself well to a staged reading. I've tried to keep actual movement, props and spoken stage directions to a minimum, but I have included a little of each where they seemed really important to make things clear for the audience or to create the desired impact.

Q: What is story of A Wonderful Suicide?
K.C.: A Wonderful Suicide explores the people and events surrounding the suicide of James Moon in 1876. Probably the most famous death in Lafayette history, Moon cut off his own head with a contraption of his own design inside the Lahr Hotel downtown on 5th Street. Through the eyes of the young boy who made drawings of the scene of death at the time and grew to become an intrepid young reporter in Lafayette, Diane's play allows you to meet those who were there, Moon's friends and family, and to discuss the nature of death and how we all relate to it.

Q: What value does the Staged Reading Series bring to Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette?
K.C.: The Staged Reading Series is terrific because it gives us here in Lafayette a chance to get a taste of so many works that may not have the mass appeal to support a major production. Not only that, but the cost of attending one of these can be much lower, so there's no reason folks on a tight budget in these times cannot still enjoy an evening out at the theatre. I've seen a number of amazing pieces produced as staged readings here in town, and I encourage everyone to really check these out.

Another reason I love the Staged Reading Series is the opportunity it gives for aspiring local actors, or even not-so-aspiring people in our community, who have ever thought they might enjoy trying their hand at theatre. It's an extremely easy way to get involved, with low time commitments and without all the extra demands of memorizing lines and movement. If you've ever thought about maybe someday getting on stage, but are worried you don't have the experience or the time, come to the next staged reading auditions. You may just surprise yourself.

Q: Is there anything else you would like to add?
K.C.: I hope to see a large audience at the staged reading on Monday, March 18. Afterward, they can ask me, Diane and the actors their own questions!

The staged reading of A Wonderful Suicide will be Monday, March 18 at 7:30 p.m. at the historic Monon Depot Theatre at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette. It is a Pay What You Can event.

There will be a question-and-answer session immediately following between the audience, the cast, the director and the playwright.

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.

Wednesday, March 13, 2013

March 20 event: Civic Theatre Needs You!


For more than 80 years, Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette has provided artistic and educational opportunities for residents in the area through theatrical productions, camps, classes and more. The Board of Directors looks forward to the next 80 years. Will you join us?

There will be an informational meeting/networking event at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette at 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday, March 20. During the meeting, attendees will learn about the duties and responsibilities of Civic Theatre's Board of Directors, Advisory Council and committees. Current members of the Board will speak about opportunities in each, as well as outline the skill sets needed to strengthen the organization's leadership base.

Patrons, volunteers, supporters and the general public are equally welcome to attend. An RSVP to Managing Director Steve Koehler is appreciated: 765-423-PLAY (7529) or steve@lafayettecivic.org

Refreshments from Adelino's Old World Kitchen will be served, and entertainment will be provided by Civic Comedy Readers and One Size Fits All Improv.

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.


Tuesday, March 12, 2013

Staged Reading Series: Going Through Hell. Meet Steve Martin, the playwright.



During the staged reading series at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette, at least one script written by a local playwright receives its world premiere. There are two scripts that will debut at Civic Theatre in the 2012-2013 Staged Reading Series. The second is Going Through Hell by Steve Martin, which will receive a staged reading Tuesday, March 19 at 7:30 p.m. in the historic Monon Depot Theatre.

Steve was interviewed by Diane Littleton Bahler, who wrote the other script that will receive its world premiere this season.

Question: How excited were you when you learned Going Through Hell had been chosen by Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette for a world premiere staged reading? Did you pee your pants?
Steve Martin: When I received the email, initially I read only that A Wonderful Suicide had been selected for a world premiere. I was disappointed for about a millisecond, then I realized that I had just completed a full-length script and submitted it to Civic Theatre's contest. I felt pretty good, then. Then I read the remainder of the message, and I was floored. This is the first time since the inaugural staged reading series that two scripts will receive world premieres. That season included Deborah Gray's Pia Zadora Sings Gershwin and Scott Haan's A Very Bad Day for Brandon Butterworth. I was happy, stunned and excited ... and I still am now!

Q: If you had to describe your play in terms of a Shakespearean play, what would it be?
S.M.: The only time my name and Shakespeare's should be used in the same sentence is, "That Steve Martin ... he's no Shakespeare."

Q: What would you like for the audience to know about Going Through Hell before they go see it?
S.M.: They should know Going Through Hell would not exist without the contributions of the Civic Playwrights Group; Kelly McBurnettte-Andronicos, the director; the cast, whose talent and enthusiasm showed me aspects of each character that I hadn't expected; and the uncountable number of friends who have heard me babble about this story since June 2012 or earlier.

Q: The play is about two men who fall in love. The Midwest isn't always the most liberal atmosphere for the creative writer who tackles the subject of same sex marriage. Did you ever feel like your creative freedom was influenced (either inwardly or outwardly) by the more conservative attitudes that seem to prevail in Indiana?
S.M.: Anyone who is creative is affected by when and where they're creating. They may acknowledge their surroundings and support them, reject them or ignore them in their work. Although marriage equality seems to be in the public's conscience at the moment, I hope I've written well-rounded characters so the play doesn't feel like a single-topic drama. The lead up to the marriage ceremony and the ceremony itself take probably five minutes in a 100-minute play. Ralph and Bike's love had to be so strong that Ralph was compelled to search for Bike after his death. I needed to show that level of commitment during the first act, and that meant they would be married. The characters aren't just saying that they're committed to one another (let's face it, talk is cheap) ... they're showing it.

Q: Speaking of the creative process, can you describe yours?
S.M.: My first step is being engaged in what is happened around me, noting whatever I find interesting - it can be joyful, profane, ludicrous, heart-wrenching, silly. Often it is something as small as a newspaper headline, maybe a painting in a book of work by "illusion" artists, or something as frivolous as thinking to myself, "I wish I could levitate to my car after work rather than walk."

The next step is writing. The Civic Playwrights Group has been important because everyone is expected to create work, read it and discuss it. This pushes me to produce and advance the story. I'm also invigorated by being around other creative people. When someone else presents a really great scene, monologue or even an outline, I think to myself, "Yes! That's awesome! I want to create something, too!"

While writing, I try to determine the key points of the plot - where the characters begin, what changes in their lives, how they complete their journey and how they've changed. I admire people who can free write without mapping out the journey; they let their characters speak and act for themselves. I have to focus mine otherwise they will go off on a tangent and I'll never seem them again.

After I've written a draft with a definite beginning, middle and end, and the Playwrights Group has heard it and offered comments, I send it to more people whose theatrical tastes I trust. They share their thoughts, and I start to polish the script.

The final step is hearing the script read aloud, and developing it further from that point.

Q: Jung said that we are all of the people in our dreams. As writers I think we both know that there is a little bit of our own souls in each of the characters we write about. Is there a character that you identify with the most in Going Through Hell?
S.M.: I can identify with all the characters. None of the play is autobiographical, but all the characters' perspectives come from me, even those that aren't noble or heroic.

Q: What is your history with playwriting? Have you written other plays?
S.M.: I was a theater major at Wabash College in Crawfordsville, Indiana, where my one-act play Waiting Room Philosophies was produced. It feels now that I constantly wrote scenes and one-acts as a student, usually for a class but not always. In graduate school in Missouri, my Master's thesis was a case study of script creation and development for a play I wrote called Song of Norma. There were no playwriting courses, but I was introduced to screenwriting through the English department.

After graduate school, I rarely did any creative writing mostly because I wrote and edited for my career. It wasn't until the Civic Playwrights Group began that I really dived back into it ... a lapse of 15 years, give or take. I'm now working on another full-length play and looking into 10-minute plays, too.

Q: Why write plays? Why not novels or poetry or some other literary form?
S.M.: At Wabash College, I also took classes in short fiction, poetry and the personal essay. I tried (and failed miserably) National Novel Writing Month in 2012. I've found an LGBT writing group in Lafayette, and our first workshop consisted of reading four poems and writing three. It felt wonderful to stretch those muscles again!

I hope to continue to write in several genres, including those mentioned above, although plays will remain my favorite. There's something special about creating live people in action, who make decisions and live through the aftereffects. Plus, theatre is the most collaborative of art forms, and I like being part of a team that works well for an end result.

Q: Steve, I know that you lead the Playwrights Group, but I have a feeling that is only the tip of the iceberg of the things you do at Civic. Can you tell me more about your involvement at Civic?
S.M.: Currently I serve as vice president of the Board of Directors. I have been volunteering at Civic for more than a decade, serving on several Board committees and directing, acting and sometimes producing shows in the MainStage, Civic Youth Theatre and Staged Reading seasons.

One of the best things about Civic is that everyone is welcome to volunteer, to share their time and energy to be part of a team that puts together a show or keeps the organization running smoothly. No matter what skill sets a person has, they can strengthen the organization. Yes, acting can be a lot of fun, but it's just as important that there are volunteers to work in the box office, to review the budget and track the financial health of the organization, to place posters around Greater Lafayette, to build sets or find costumes, or to find people to serve on committees. And there are so many opportunities to grow and develop skills.

Q: Where does Going Through Hell go from here?
S.M.: The staged reading on March 19 will have an enormous impact on its development. During the Q&A session, I expect to ask a lot of questions of the audience. I want to know what they thought about various parts of the plot, the characters and the overall story. After the staged reading, I'll invite the cast, director and my friends to join me for breakfast at IHOP. Then I'll go home, fall asleep and make no plans to wake up until noon or so. When I do, I probably will put the script in a drawer and keep it shut for about a week - the notes, too - so that I can enjoy the thrill of having seen the characters I created appear on stage.

I'll look at the script again, look at my notes, perhaps review the staged reading on DVD. I'll try to be as objective as possible when I review them, and then make changes, adjustments, tweaks - hopefully no wholesale changes, though, unless there are extreme problems - and create the "final, final" version of the play.

I'll research theaters, agents and publishers who have an interest in this kind of play. Perhaps I'll submit it to contests, or perhaps there are opportunities for more readings, workshops, productions or even personal development. Regardless of how many rejection notices I receive, I will send Going Through Hell out into the larger theatrical world after the staged reading. I want to see it in a production, I want the characters and the settings to take physical form, I want to see and hear the story unfold in front of me. That's why playwrights write: to see and hear their plays on the stage. During all this, I'll finish my next script and start the process of sharing all over again.

Q: What questions would you like for me to ask you about Going Through Hell and how would you answer it?
S.M.: "Steve, can I buy your breakfast at IHOP following the staged reading of Going Through Hell on March 19?" Of course you can, Diane. Your generosity is heartwarming. Can I get a Breakfast Sampler and a Rooty Tooty Fresh 'N Fruity?

The staged reading of Going Through Hell will be Tuesday, March 19 at 7:30 p.m. at the historic Monon Depot Theatre at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette. It is a Pay What You Can event.

There will be a question-and-answer session immediately following between the audience, the cast, the director and the playwright.

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.

The Review is In: The Fox on the Fairway.



The review of The Fox on the Fairway was published in the Journal & Courier, Lafayette and West Lafayette's daily newspaper. It was written by Tim Brouk.

You can read the review here.

The Fox on the Fairway has two more weekends of performances at the historic Monon Depot Theatre at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette. Friday and Saturday shows begin at 7:30 p.m. The Sunday shows begin at 2:30 p.m.

Tickets are $18 for adults, $15 for senior citizens and $10 for youth age 18 and under. To order tickets, call 765-423-PLAY (7529) or visit http://lafayettecivic.tix.com. Follow @lafayettecivic on Twitter to learn about the availability of Rush tickets before each performance for students with a valid college or high school ID.

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.