Friday, February 28, 2014

Civic Theatre on YouTube: Lost in Yonkers


The following preview of Lost in Yonkers, the fourth show in the 2013-2014 MainStage season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette, has been added to the Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette channel on YouTube.

Thanks to Steve Scherer for creating this video.


Lost in Yonkers opens tonight, Friday, February 28 and runs through Saturday, March 15 at the historic Monon Depot Theatre, 320 N. 5th Street - the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette. Friday and Saturday shows are at 7:30 p.m. The Sunday shows are at 2:30 p.m.

Tickets are $18 for adults, $15 for seniors and $10 for youth age 18 and under. To purchase tickets, call 765-423-7529 or visit http://lafayettecivic.tix.com. Follow @lafayettecivic on Twitter twenty minutes before each performance to learn about Rush ticket availability for students with valid college or high school IDs.

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.

Opening Night: Lost in Yonkers. Preview on jconline.com


A preview of Neil Simon's Lost in Yonkers appears online at http://www.jconline.com, the website for the Journal & Courier, Greater Lafayette's daily newspaper.

You can read the preview here.

Lost in Yonkers opens tonight, February 28 and runs through Saturday, March 15 at the historic Monon Depot Theatre, 320 N. 5th Street – the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette. Friday and Saturday shows begin at 7:30 p.m. The Sunday show begins at 2:30 p.m.

Tickets are $18 for adults, $15 for seniors and $10 for youth age 18 and under. To purchase tickets, call 765-423-7529 or visit http://lafayettecivic.tix.com.  Follow #lafayettecivic on Twitter twenty minutes before each performance to learn about Rush ticket availability for students with valid college or high school IDs.

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.


Thursday, February 27, 2014

The Staged Reading Series: To Tread Among Serpents on March 4











The fifth staged reading of the 2013-2014 Staged Reading Series at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is To Tread Among Serpents by Kelly McBurnette-Andronicos. The staged reading will mark its world premiere.

Steve Martin directs the cast, which includes Andrea Jakeman, Michelle Bonora, Twana A. Harris, Eric Francis, Mike Atwell, Cresta Cates, Scott Hankins, Debra Humphrey John and Rick Siler.

Deep in 1959 Southern Appalachia, Pentecostal snake handler and pig farmer Violet Haight is eager to talk about how she butchered and scattered the hacked-up remains of two men over 75 miles of country roads, as long as the ambitious urbanite reporter and crime writer Juanita "JC" Cohen is able to satisfy Violet's desire for celebrity and appetite for vengeance. To Tread Among Serpents is based on a true story.

The staged reading of To Tread Among Serpents will be Tuesday, March 4 at 7:30 p.m. in the historic Monon Depot Theatre, 320 N. 5th Street – on the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette. It is a Pay What You Can event, general admission tickets are available the night of the staged reading.

There will be a question-and-answer session between the audience, the cast, the director and the playwright immediately following.

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

The Staged Reading Series: To Tread Among Serpents. Meet Kelly McBurnette-Andronicos, the playwright.



During Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette's Staged Reading Series, at least one play written by a local playwright will make its world premiere. This year's play is To Tread Among Serpents by Kelly McBurnette-Andronicos.

Question: Why did you write To Tread Among Serpents?
Kelly McBurnette-Andronicos: When I was six years old, our neighbor leaned into my mother's rolled-down car window and asked, "Ja hear? Viola Hiatt's outta jail." That's when I learned about the gruesome double murder that happened years earlier in my sleepy, rural community. An arm was found near my house, and down the road I used to hunt for fossils in Arm and Leg Creek. The story of Violet Haight, a.k.a. Viola Hiatt, has always been the Southern Gothic backdrop that frames my writing.

Q: What is the story of To Tread Among Serpents?
K. McB-A.: On the surface, it's a fictionalized account of the 1959 Torso Slayer Murders, a crime so spectacularly brutal, people still talk about it fifty years later. On a deeper level, it's a commentary on the ways in which the media exploits crime, criminals and victims through the marketing of sex and violence. It's also an exploration into the entertainment industry's perverted influence over the American justice system.

Q: What was your writing process? How long have you lived with the story?
K. McB-A.: I read everything about the case I could find, which consisted entirely of newspaper accounts, an article in a crime magazine and a couple of web articles. I contacted the county clerk for the court records and tracked down the original coroner in the case and interviewed him. He's well into his 90's but remembered the crime scene and investigation in great detail. The research took weeks; the writing took about nine months. I've lived with the story my whole life, and the play itself for about a year.

Q: How will the staged reading benefit you and the script?
K. McB-A.: Actors are very good at sniffing out inconsistencies, as they necessarily see the play from their own character's narrow point of view. Working with a director is helpful because he/she can show the many ways in which the script can be interpreted. A director and actors working together can surface all manner of connections and meanings in the script the writer never knew existed.

Q: When and how did you become interested in writing plays?
K. McB-A.: I've been an actor since I was two years old. A few years ago, when I lived in Ithaca, New York, I read the lead role in playwright Judith Pratt's staged reading of Maize about Nobel Prize winner Barbara McClintock. Soon after, I saw Ross Haarstad's production of Kit Wainer's wacky queermonsterfreaks. Two very different plays by two women I know and admire. I wanted to write something and writing a 70-page play seemed easier than writing a novel.

Q: How many plays have you written? What do they share in common?
K. McB-A.: In addition to To Tread Among Serpents, I've written the full-length The Resurrection of the Publick Universal Friend, about a cross-dressing Quaker heretic who claimed to be raised from the dead, and the 10-minute El Loro, El Gato y El EspĂ­ritu Santo, about three sisters who cover up a murder that never happened. I'm currently working on the Spanish Gothic play The Hall of Final Ruin about the notorious Gerturdis "La Tules" Barcelo whose last conquest is to die well. Religion, moral ambiguity, Gothicism, magical realism and gender/race/class are all central themes I use in an historical context, and all are commentaries on some element of contemporary society.

Q: What do you think about Civic Theatre's staged reading series?
K. McB-A.: It's virtually impossible for a new play to get a staged reading at an established theatre. The chances of it being produced are even smaller. Civic is playing a critical role in discovering and developing new plays by local writers for the American stage. I would argue it's exactly the kind of enterprise an established community theatre like Civic should engage in, and they've been particularly successful in promoting women playwrights like Laurie Russell, Deborah Gray and Diane Littleton Bahler. Women's representation in professional theatre nationwide remains disappointingly low, about 17%, so it's great that our local theatre is taking a leadership position on this equity issue.

The staged reading of To Tread Among Serpents will be Tuesday, March 4 at 7:30 p.m. at the historic Monon Depot Theatre, 320 N. 5th Street – the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette. It is a Pay What You Can event.

There will be a question-and-answer session immediately following between the audience, the cast, the director and the playwright.

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

The Drama Book Club on March 4: Rock 'n' Roll by Tom Stoppard

The  Drama Book Club selection for March 2014 is Tom Stoppard's Rock 'n' Roll. Visit here for a synopsis of this full-length dramatic comedy.

The meeting will be Tuesday, March 4 at 5:30 p.m. at Robots & Rogues: New and Used Books, 531 Main St. in downtown Lafayette. The script can be purchased at Robots & Rogues during its business hours.

For more information about the Drama Book Club, call Civic Theatre of GreaterLafayette at 765-423-7529 or Robots & Rogues at 765-409-5022.

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and education opportunities.

In the Wings: Lost in Yonkers. Meet Omar Almakki.



Omar Almakki plays Jay in Lost in Yonkers, the fourth show in the 2013-2014 MainStage season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. Neil Simon wrote the script.

Question: Who is Jay?
Omar Almakki: Jay is the more serious of the two brothers. He's very educated, very smart and serious, but he's not above joking at times.

Q: What is fun about playing him?
O.A.: The most fun is when Jay gets a one-liner, which normally go to Arty. That's a lot of fun. Also, Jay gives Arty a lot of dirty looks during the play when Arty is joking during a very serious situation.

Q: What is your earliest memory of spending an extended period of time away from your parents?
O.A.: My parents had to go away for a month for the Hajj, an Islamic pilgrimage. I spent time with my brother and my aunt at our house. There was nothing really memorable about it, it was pretty much the same as usual.

Lost in Yonkers runs Friday, February 28 through Saturday, March 15 at the historic Monon Depot Theatre, 320 N. 5th Street, at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette. Friday and Saturday shows begin at 7:30 p.m. The Sunday show begins at 2:30 p.m.

Tickets are $18 for adults, $15 for seniors and $10 for youth age 18 and under. Call 765-423-7529 or visit http://lafayettecivic.tix.com to learn about ticket availability or to purchase tickets in advance. Follow @lafayettecivic on Twitter twenty minutes before each performance to learn about Rush ticket availability for students with valid college or high school IDs.

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.

Monday, February 24, 2014

In the Wings: Lost in Yonkers. Meet Lee Sullivan.



Lee Sullivan plays Grandma Kurnitz in Lost in Yonkers, the fourth show in the 2013-2014 MainStage season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. Neil Simon wrote the script.

Question: Who is Grandma Kurnitz?
Lee Sullivan: She is a German-Jewish woman who grew up in Germany. She moved to the United States, to the Bronx, after she was married and had six children. She and her husband established a candy shop and soda fountain. After he died, she continued to keep it up. She is kind of a mean old lady. She was raised to be tough and she expects her children to be tough and take care of themselves.

Q: What is fun about playing her?
L.S.: In Still Kicking, I played myself. In Lost in Yonkers, I feel I have to stretch a bit to be as mean as Grandma Kurnitz.

Q: What is your earliest memory of spending an extended period of time away from your parents?
L.S.: When I was fourteen, between my 8th grade graduation and first year of high school, I left home to live with a family that needed a babysitter. I didn't like it. The kids were difficult, and I'm afraid I could have turned into Grandma Kurnitz for them.

Lost in Yonkers runs Friday, February 28 through Saturday, March 15 at the historic Monon Depot Theatre, 320 N. 5th Street, at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette. Friday and Saturday shows begin at 7:30 p.m. The Sunday show begins at 2:30 p.m.

Tickets are $18 for adults, $15 for seniors and $10 for youth age 18 and under. Call 765-423-7529 or visit http://lafayettecivic.tix.com to learn about ticket availability or to purchase tickets in advance. Follow @lafayettecivic on Twitter twenty minutes before each performance to learn about Rush ticket availability for students with valid college or high school IDs.

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.

Friday, February 21, 2014

In the Wings: Lost in Yonkers. Meet Kate Martin



Kate Martin plays Bella in Lost in Yonkers, the fourth show in the 2013-2014 MainStage season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. Neil Simon wrote the script.

Question: Why did you audition for the play?
Kate Martin: I heard Civic Theatre was doing it, so I got a copy of the script and read it. I just love it. I love Neil Simon's plays, I love family comedy-dramas and I knew I wanted to play Bella because she is a challenge and such a terrific character.

Q: Who is Bella?
K.M.: Bella is Jay and Arty's aunt. She's the youngest of Grandma Kurnitz's children. She still lives at home with Grandma. She's very sweet and would do anything for you. She has some trouble thinking and really processing information. Grandma's been afraid to let her go out on her own.

Q: What is fun about playing her?
K.M.: It's a challenge that I've not had to play yet. You have to learn all your lines first, and then Bella has to really think and concentrate about what she's going to say before she says it. It takes her twice as long to think things out. It's interesting to find how she really is healthy and normal in some ways, and in some ways she's like a child.

Q: What is your earliest memory of spending an extended period of time away from your parents?
K.M.: I stayed with my Dad's mother for a few days in Columbus, Ohio. That was fun. She had an evil cat, a black cat that would corner you in the hallway in the night when you got up to go to the bathroom.

Lost in Yonkers runs Friday, February 28 through Saturday, March 15 at the historic Monon Depot Theatre, 320 N. 5th Street, at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette. Friday and Saturday shows begin at 7:30 p.m. The Sunday show begins at 2:30 p.m.

Tickets are $18 for adults, $15 for seniors and $10 for youth age 18 and under. Call 765-423-7529 or visit http://lafayettecivic.tix.com to learn about ticket availability or to purchase tickets in advance. Follow @lafayettecivic on Twitter twenty minutes before each performance to learn about Rush ticket availability for students with valid college or high school IDs.

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.

Announcing the cast of To Tread Among Serpents


Director Steve Martin has announced the cast of To Tread Among Serpents, the fifth staged reading of the 2013-2014 Staged Reading Series at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. Local playwright Kelly McBurnette-Andronicos wrote the script, which is receiving its world premiere.

The cast includes:

* The Janitor - Twana A. Harris
* Jasper "Junior" Scroggins - Eric Francis
* Juanita "JC" Cohen - Andrea Jakeman
* Violet Haight - Michelle Bonora
* Lulu Lemoine - Twana A. Harris
* Chorus - Mike Atwell, Cresta Cates, Scott Hankins, Rick Siler
* Narrator - Debra Humphrey John

Deep in 1959 Southern Appalachia, Pentecostal snake handler and pig farmer Violet Haight is eager to talk about how she butchered and scattered the hacked-up remains of two men over 75 miles of country roads, as long as the ambitious urbanite reporter and crime writer Juanita "JC" Cohen is able to satisfy Violet's desire for celebrity and appetite for vengeance. To Tread Among Serpents is based on a true story.

The staged reading of To Tread Among Serpents will be Tuesday, March 4 at 7:30 p.m. in the historic Monon Depot Theatre at 320 N. 5th Street in downtown Lafayette – the corner of 5th Street and North Street.

It is a Pay What You Can event. A question-and-answer session between the playwright, the cast, the director and the audience will immediately follow the reading.

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.

Thursday, February 20, 2014

In the Wings: Lost in Yonkers. Meet Timothy Devery.



Timothy Devery plays Louie in Lost in Yonkers, the fourth show in the 2013-2014 MainStage season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. Neil Simon wrote the script.

Question: Who is Louie?
Timothy Devery: He is the second oldest of Grandma Kurnitz's boys. He has turned the wrong way in life, he works for the mob. He's the strongest of the kids, he learned from his mother well. She taught to live by any means possible, so his means is to take from others. He's on the run.

Q: What is fun about playing him?
T.D.: He's different from most roles I've played. He's not a complete jerk, which is nice, but he's also macho, which is nice. He's part of the family, and it's important to all of them to be connected. He's also mentoring the boys, Jay and Arty; he isn't steering them in the same direction he's going, though.

Q: What is your earliest memory of spending an extended period of time away from your parents?
T.D.: I got mononucleosis when I was in third grade, and then I was shipped off to my grandparents in New Jersey for a long time. I lost a lot of weight, I ate a lot of soup, I curdled milk in my body and vomited up cottage cheese.

Lost in Yonkers runs Friday, February 28 through Saturday, March 15 at the historic Monon Depot Theatre, 320 N. 5th Street, at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette. Friday and Saturday shows begin at 7:30 p.m. The Sunday show begins at 2:30 p.m.

Tickets are $18 for adults, $15 for seniors and $10 for youth age 18 and under. Call 765-423-7529 or visit http://lafayettecivic.tix.com to learn about ticket availability or to purchase tickets in advance. Follow @lafayettecivic on Twitter twenty minutes before each performance to learn about Rush ticket availability for students with valid college or high school IDs.

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

In the Wings: Lost in Yonkers. Meet Kyle Borcz.



Kyle Borcz plays Eddie in Lost in Yonkers, the fourth show in the 2013-2014 MainStage season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. Neil Simon wrote the script.

Question: Who is Eddie?
Kyle Borcz: Eddie is the father of the boys, Jay and Arty. He is the eldest surviving son in the Kurnitz family. His heart may be a little too big for his family. He's the emotional one, he's a little neurotic. Eddie suffered a big loss before the start of the play, which adds to his neurosis. It's left him in a very, very bad way financially. He has to find somewhere for his sons to live while he earns money to pay off debts.

Q: What is fun about playing him?
K.B.: He goes through a whole range of emotions in one scene. He's very upset and nervous and cautious, but wants to make sure the boys are perfect and looking good and clean. He's pouring his heart out to the boys, comforting his sister and being in awe and afraid of his mother. In thirty-five pages, it's emotionally up and down and up and down and up and down.

Q: What is your earliest memory of spending an extended period of time away from your parents?
K.B.: Other than a few days with Grandma and Grandpa, there wasn't a lot of time I spent away from my parents until college. The first time one my friends wanted to visit Springfield, about an hour away, my first instinct was to call my parents. And as I was dialing, I said, "What am I doing?" I hung up the phone and went on my merry way.

Lost in Yonkers runs Friday, February 28 through Saturday, March 15 at the historic Monon Depot Theatre, 320 N. 5th Street, at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette. Friday and Saturday shows begin at 7:30 p.m. The Sunday show begins at 2:30 p.m.

Tickets are $18 for adults, $15 for seniors and $10 for youth age 18 and under. Call 765-423-7529 or visit http://lafayettecivic.tix.com to learn about ticket availability or to purchase tickets in advance. Follow @lafayettecivic on Twitter twenty minutes before each performance to learn about Rush ticket availability for students with valid college or high school IDs.

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

In the Wings: Lost in Yonkers. Meet Sara Daly Brosman.



Sara Daly Brosman plays Gert in Lost in Yonkers, the fourth show in the 2013-2014 MainStage season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. Neil Simon wrote the script.

Question: Why did you audition for Lost in Yonkers?
Sara Daly Brosman: I love this play. I have done plays in Delphi with the public library for the last 17 or 18 years. We were hoping to do the play this summer, but since Civic Theatre is going it, we decided not to. I was in Lafayette one day and I knew auditions were that evening, so I thought, "What the heck, I'll go ahead and audition." I like Neil Simon's plays, especially this one because it's really clever, well written and I love the dynamics of the family.

Question: Who is Gert?
S.D.B.: Gert is Bella's older sister. She is damaged by her childhood, as are the other characters in the cast. She has a problem with her speech as a result of being a little intimidated by her mother growing up. I see Gert as being fearful of being in the presence of Grandma. She hasn't quite outgrown that.

Q: What is fun about playing her?
S.D.B.: What has been challenging is working on a Yonkers accent, but also the distinct speech impediment that Gert has. I can take certain liberties with her because she is over-the-top; you have to love her and you have to accept her for all of her flaws, including her inability to communicate very easily.

Q: What is your earliest memory of spending an extended period of time away from your parents?
S.D.B.: I come from a large family. There were nine of us, so going on family vacations in one vehicle was not very doable. One family vacation there was no room for my sister Chris and I in the family station wagon. We were farmed out to our Aunt Clara's house, but that was not a bad thing. She was an older aunt, and her children were raised, and she treated us really, really well. It wasn't a bad experience at all. In fact, I felt kind of pampered.

Lost in Yonkers runs Friday, February 28 through Saturday, March 15 at the historic Monon Depot Theatre, 320 N. 5th Street, at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette. Friday and Saturday shows begin at 7:30 p.m. The Sunday show begins at 2:30 p.m.

Tickets are $18 for adults, $15 for seniors and $10 for youth age 18 and under. Call 765-423-7529 or visit http://lafayettecivic.tix.com to learn about ticket availability or to purchase tickets in advance. Follow @lafayettecivic on Twitter twenty minutes before each performance to learn about Rush ticket availability for students with valid college or high school IDs.

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.

Monday, February 17, 2014

In the Wings: Lost in Yonkers. Meet John Carlson.



John Carlson plays Arty in Lost in Yonkers, the fourth show in the 2013-2014 MainStage season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. Neil Simon wrote the script.

Question: Who is Arty?
John Carlson: Arty is a happy, energetic, thirteen-year old boy.

Q: What is fun about playing him?
J.C.: He is the comic relief, so that's fun. Most of his lines are funny, and the way he says them is sarcastic.

Q: What is your earliest memory of spending an extended period of time away from your parents?
J.C.: It was with my grandparents, which was the first time I saw Star Wars. That was fun.

Lost in Yonkers runs Friday, February 28 through Saturday, March 15 at the historic Monon Depot Theatre, 320 N. 5th Street, at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette. Friday and Saturday shows begin at 7:30 p.m. The Sunday show begins at 2:30 p.m.

Tickets are $18 for adults, $15 for seniors and $10 for youth age 18 and under. Call 765-423-7529 or visit http://lafayettecivic.tix.com to learn about ticket availability or to purchase tickets in advance. Follow @lafayettecivic on Twitter twenty minutes before each performance to learn about Rush ticket availability for students with valid college or high school IDs.

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.

Sunday, February 16, 2014

Share Your Thoughts: 13


Now that 13 has closed, share your thoughts about the production.

What will you remember about it? What are your thoughts about the performances? The story and themes? The design? What were the standout moments?

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.

Thursday, February 13, 2014

Announcing auditions: Mame


Director Susan Kisinger and musical director Bill Kisinger have announced audition information for Mame, the fifth and final production in the 2013-2014 MainStage season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee wrote the book and Jerry Herman wrote the music and lyrics. It is based on Patrick Dennis' 1955 novel Auntie Mame.

Who is Mame? Some of Mame's wild, adventurous spirit is inside everyone who lives for the moment and believes that "life is a banquet!" It's the height of the 1920s and Auntie Mame becomes the guardian for her ten-year-old nephew, Patrick. Special songs include "Mame," "It's Today," "Open a New Window," "We Need a Little Christmas," and "Bosom Buddies." Mame's life is turned upside down, many of her priorities change, but she still lives life to the fullest!

Auditions will be Sunday, March 2 from 6 p.m.-9 p.m. and Monday, March 3 from 7 p.m.-9:30 p.m. at Turning Pointe Academy, 3000 U.S. 52 W in West Lafayette. It is located across from Klondike School. Auditions are by appointment; call Civic Theatre at 765-423-7529 to set an appointment.

Susan and Bill look to cast a large number of people who are a diverse range of ages. Two actors will play Patrick, one who can portray ages 10-13 and one who can portray 18-29.

Auditioners will read from the script and prepare a song about 90 seconds in length, an accompanist will be provided. Dance auditions led by choreographers Alisha Kuckartz and Hannah Hawkins will be held both nights: 7:15-7:45 p.m. on Sunday, 8:15-8:45 p.m. on Monday. Please wear comfortable clothes.

Mame will be performed Friday, May 9 through Sunday, May 11 at Sunnyside Intermediate School auditorium, 530 N. 26th Street in Lafayette. Friday and Saturday shows are at 7:30 p.m., the Sunday show is at 2:30 p.m.

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.

In the Wings: 13. Meet Aaron Walker.



Aaron Walker plays Brett in 13, the third show in the 2013-2014 Civic Youth Theatre season at Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette. Jason Robert Brown wrote the music and lyrics, and Dan Elish and Robert Horn wrote the book.

Question: Why did you audition for 13?
Aaron Walker: I auditioned because this is a show with a bunch of kids our age, and I'm glad to have a sense of reality from my world in this production.

Q: Who is Brett?
A.W.: Brett is a ladies man. He's really cocky, he knows he can get any girl he wants. He's a modern-day jerk, a jock kind of guy who thinks he's better than everyone else. I like playing Brett because he is very lively and a high-energy person, and so am I. He likes to have fun with what he does.

Q: What is the best age, whether you've already reached it or not?
A.W.: 13. You have everything handed to you. Life isn't hard yet, and you don't get your first dose of the real world until you're officially an adult. You've got to enjoy what your parents give you, you have to be grateful.

13 runs Friday, February 14 through Sunday, February 16 at the historic Monon Depot Theatre, 320 N. 5th Street, at the corner of 5th Street and North Street in downtown Lafayette. Friday and Saturday shows begin at 7:30 p.m. The Sunday show begins at 2:30 p.m.

Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for youth age 18 and under. Tickets can be purchased by calling 765-423-7529 or visiting http://lafayettecivic.tix.com This show contains some material that may be considered unsuitable for younger audiences. Patrons are welcome to read a copy of the script prior to purchasing tickets.

The mission of Civic Theatre of Greater Lafayette is to enhance the artistic and cultural environment of Greater Lafayette through theatrical productions and educational opportunities.